Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a networked computer on a different subnet (192.168.100., where as I am on a 10.100 ip address). The target computer is not bound to a domain, unlike our 10.* computers which our bound to ourdomain. I am able to browse, with Windows Explorer, any computer bound to the domain. However, I am unable to do so with the target computer that is not.

A colleague added his username and password to the target computer, and is able to browse to it just fine (i.e., if his login is normally \ourdomain\username, he created a local account on the target computer that is just named username, and set it's password to be identical). I attempted the same trick, but still am unable to browse to the network location.

The computer is most certainly reachable - I can remote-desktop to it just fine. But I'd like to be able to browse to it with Windows Explorer, e.g. \\target\d$\. Any idea what must be done?

My computer is Windows 7 32bit, target is Windows 2008R2. My collegue (who has it working), is also on Windows 7, but 64bit.

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Most likely network discovery is turned off on the target machine along with the firewall identifying the network as a public network. Have him go into the network and sharing center control panel, change the zone of that connection to WORK, and enable network discovery and file sharing on that zone. That should take care of the firewall configuration as well.

share|improve this answer
    
but why would it be working for my colleague, but not me? –  Matt May 2 '12 at 16:18
    
If he on the 10.100 network or the 192.168.100 network with the server? –  SpacemanSpiff May 2 '12 at 18:04
    
We are both on the 10.100, the target was on a 192.168. But it's working now, if I use IP directly. –  Matt May 2 '12 at 18:13
    
Hrmm, probably some kind of NetBIOS name resolution issue. –  SpacemanSpiff May 2 '12 at 18:36
add comment

So, the target computer actually has multiple IP addresses. It turns out if I reference the IP directly, instead of using name resolution, it works just fine.

e.g.

\\targetname\d$

vs.

\\192.168.100.123\d$
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.