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I have installed CentOS 6 in Virtualbox. Although I have chosen to install General Purpose GNOME Desktop, the GNOME desktop does not start. All I get is a black and white text prompt. I would like to know how I can install GNOME Desktop from the CentOS DVD.

  1. How do I mount the DVD image?

  2. How do I install GNOME desktop from command line?

  3. If I already have the GNOME Desktop installed, why doesn't it start? How can I check from command line that I have GNOME installled?

This virtual machine does not have internet connection, that's why I want to install the GNOME Desktop from DVD.

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2 Answers 2

1) if you have an iso file you can do something like this;

# mkdir /tmp/dvd1 /tmp/dvd2
# mount -ro loop CentOS-6.0-x86_64-bin-DVD1.iso /tmp/dvd1
# mount -ro loop CentOS-6.0-x86_64-bin-DVD2.iso /tmp/dvd2

2) I think you would need the following under CentOS to get a desktop, which gives you a gnome 2 environment on centOs 6.x

 yum groupinstall "General Purpose Desktop"

3) I suspect if you are missing some packages from the install above, then a reboot will do the trick, however if not you can try /usr/bin/gnome-session (however I don't run gnome so, you might wish to update your question if you are happy the packages are installed, but gnome won't automatically start the session manager.

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YUM should tell you if the GNOME group is installed:

yum grouplist

should report the General Purpose Desktop as an installed group if GNOME is installed.

If NOME is installed but you are just getting a text login prompt it may be that your default runlevel is not set to 5 (the necessary level for automatically starting an Xwindows style session).

Login and check your runlevel with:

who -r

If you are at run-level 3 you can just use the "startx" command to try and start the GNOME session. If this works then check you default run-level in /etc/inittab:

grep default /etc/inittab

It should read something like:

id:5:initdefault:

If it is set to "id:3:initdefault:" you can edit the level to 5 from 3 so that you get a Gnome session on next boot.

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