Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't understand the difference. Is C: or D: a volume and LUN a target like "disk 1" when I go to the disk manager? Except, that 'disk 1" is really an iSCSI target on a SAN?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

Yes. A LUN is a logical volume from the point of view of the storage. From the client point of view the LUN it is a disc volume that can be partitioned.

Volume is a generic term. It means a contiguous storage area. This means that you might need to partition it and that you might also need to create a filesystem. Some programs can work directly with a volume without having a partition or a filesystem. So by volume you can consider a LUN, a partition or even a file (loop-back mounted volume, DB volume), depending on the context.

C: and D: is, usually, a mounted disk partition. This means that the kernel expose to the programs the volume as a filesystem.

Oh, and you can mount the same filesystem in 2 places at once at the same time. E.g having C: D:\mountpoint\ pointing to the same partition.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.