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I'm a programmer by trade but often dabble in sysadmin tasks and responsibilities. I have recently been tasked with setting up a Windows Server 2003 networking environment for a small business with multiple branches.

The business already has a domain name they use to host a website at www.example.com. Currently the DNS nameservers are at Zerigo and I would very much like it to remain that way (as they specialize in just providing DNS services and they do this very well). We also have a bunch of other subdomains we use to conviniently connect to the various branches that have static IPs assigned from ISPs, so we're able to connect easily to branch1.example.com.

Is it possible to 'redirect' all intranet.example.com DNS requests to a Windows box?

I've been doing a little reading and I see there are NS records that might be able to do this, and the Windows DNS server could then perform all of the lookups for that subdomain, say, server1.intranet.example.com or client5.intranet.example.com. This would seem better to me, than registering a new domain name for the organisation, as keeping a single domain name makes more organizational sense.

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It occurs to me that I may only need to point intranet.example.com to the DNS server which will handle any of the host.intranet.example.com requests simply "by design" of DNS. Is this the case? –  user125248 Jun 19 '12 at 20:42
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After a little research I've decided this is simply a case of using DNS Delegation. I need to add an NS record to specify the nameserver at intranet.example.com (so dns1.intranet.example.com) plus an A record that locates dns1.intranet.example.com. Haven't done a empirical test yet though.

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