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In a couple of areas we have multiple devices that all run on 5v and have multiple adapters with standard jacks, which annoyingly require multiple sockets and cables.

Does anything like an adapter splitter exist? Or an adapter with multiple leads?

Cheers,

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was just wondering this to reduce several wall-warts for phone, answering machine, etc... the idea of using a PC powersupply occured to me, but I'd likely fry the equipment somehow. –  ericslaw Jul 15 '09 at 20:00
    
So long as the voltage is right, it will be fine. The problem with using a PC power supply is that you have to tell it to turn on. :-) –  staticsan Jul 15 '09 at 23:16
    
@staticsan, if you can find one an old AT power supply would work. –  Zoredache Oct 4 '09 at 2:06

6 Answers 6

Here's one by Kensington.

Kensington K38035US Power AdaptorPower Tips

And they have power tips.

Here is a USB cable and an example of a power tip from iGo

iGo USB CableExample iGo Power Tip

Here is a really cool travel surge protector from Belkin that has two USB power outputs.

Belkin Mini Surge Protector with USB

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It looks like he'd also need mini-USB to barrel type adaptors, but this might just work. –  Ernie Jul 15 '09 at 21:23
    
@Ernie: Thanks for the suggestion. I've added an example. I'm sure others are available. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 15 '09 at 21:31

Well, adaptor splitters don't exist, that's for sure. Unless you had one adaptor with a high current output (say, 5A), you wouldn't be able to supply enough power to multiple devices.

I suppose it would be easy enough to make: all you'd need would be a power supply with sufficient current output to power all the devices you want. Then solder together some cords in parallel that wire into the base. Tape or shrink-tube the exposed wiring and you're done.

If that part is lost on you, I suggest not making your own. :)

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Visit your local electronics store and see if they have a suitable ready built power supply if you can't/won't make your own. –  John Gardeniers Jul 15 '09 at 21:37

It doesnt look like such a thing exists. Unless you make one yourself.

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Have a look in a musical instrument store, specifically one that sells electric guitars. A lot of effects pedals are 9V powered and have both a battery and an external power socket. Since the people who buy those often have several, there are also looms/splitters available so one power supply can power half-a-dozen pedals. I know you wanted 5V, not 9V, so you'd have to modify or replace the actual power supply.

You could also look in an electronics parts store (In Australia, I'd point you to Jaycar.) or one of those PC oddment stores that sell less common PC stuff, like POS-terminal keyboards and USB-SCSI adapters. They often advertise in magazines.

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It should be pretty simple to get someone who knows how to use a soldering iron to make up a splitter loom, but the (slightly) more difficult bit would be get a 5VDC power supply capable of supplying sufficient current for all of the devices.

For the power supply add up the wattage rating on each of the warts and get a power supply that meets or, preferably, exceeds that total by at least 15% (so it doesn't run too hot). Also have some sort of mounting, so it is not sitting on the carpet, etc.

For the loom ensure that the cable is figure-8 style power cable, not axial style signal cable - they have very different load carrying capabilities. Probably best to protect the common joins in a small box with strain reliefs (e.g. cable ties).

HTH.

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http://www.freepatentsonline.com/6879497.html

I just saw this when searching for this product

seems someone else has thought of it but has not done anything about it

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That's for multiple voltages while the OP's question is regarding multiple outputs of a single voltage. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 3 '10 at 0:47

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