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How do you do Load Testing and Capacity Planning for Web Sites

I know it's a very open question, but I think it can be answered more or less. I will soon release a service. The topology:

-> one VPS with nginx / eAccelerator / php-fpm , with 4Gb RAM and apparently with an excellent internet connection. This is the entry point, it is a simple PHP application that builds the startup code by including code & HTML chunks. That is, the PHP app ONLY does includes from disk. No sessions, no URL access, no anything. Just conditional includes.

-> one VPS with tomcat, postgresql, same configuration: 4Gb RAM, same server farm. Accessed directly by the clients.

I'd like to know what kind of performance to expect, specially from server (1). I am running a 1000-users beta. Do you think this will be more or less enough IF stuff is properly written, optimized and configured? Make all assumptions you want or find missing, don't worry, I will learn from every answer and extrapolate. It will be very valuable to me if somebody can post actual cheap VPS performance numbers. I don't know in what terrain I'm moving!

Thanx in advance!

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jul 30 '12 at 21:55

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marked as duplicate by Mark Henderson Jul 30 '12 at 21:58

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will you explain the "IF stuff" a little more ? sounds like autoloading but not sure how you "include" a specific extension or something on the fly. –  Ayesh K Jul 29 '12 at 17:51
    
This question is impossible to answer. 4gig of ram is all nice sounding, but it's pointless if you're running this code on an 8088-4.77mhz. If it's a multi-core xeon server, oooh shiny... but if the disk subsystem consists of a paper tape and a 200yo senior work a hole punch, you'll still get crap performance. –  Marc B Jul 29 '12 at 18:15
    
Please seee: meta.serverfault.com/questions/2612/… –  Mark Henderson Jul 30 '12 at 21:59
    
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1 Answer

For 1000 users, it should be enough, provided all of them aren't using the site at the exact same moment. If your PHP code is as simple as you describe, you could probably squeeze significant performance by moving to SSI instead, since PHP will be your biggest CPU and memory hog.

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