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I am trying to configure my fresh install of Ubuntu Server 12.04 to act as a entry point for two of my networks (the machine has 3 ethernet cards). The basic setup I am looking to achieve is to connect via PPPoE on eth0 and share that internet connection on eth1 & eth2, also providing a DHCP service on eth1 & eth2.

So far I have only figured out how to connect to the internet on eth0, can someone please guide my through the rest of the process for what I am trying to achieve?

Thanks, Alex.

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1 Answer 1

So basically you are building a router that connects 2 local LAN's to the internet.

You will have to manually configure the local LAN's, the NAT between the internet and the local LANs, the firewalls, the DHCP service and (possibly) DNS (mixed local DNS and Internet DNS maybe ?).
I'm probably forgetting a couple of things in that list.
Doing it from scratch is certainly possible, but will take an entire book to explain.

Why don't you use a specialized Linux distro like pfSense for that ? Much, much easier to setup and maintain.

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Could you please give me an example of how pfSense is a better option? –  Alex Hope O'Connor Aug 8 '12 at 10:46
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Not necessarily better, but if you just want a full-featured router it is a lot easier and quicker to setup/configure/maintain. If you DIY on basis of a regular Linux distro there is a big chance you spend many hours figuring out how to do things that in pfSense or a similar setup would take you 5 minutes to set up. If you want to DIY for the sake of learning/developing your skills then go ahead. (You still may want to take a look at pfSense anyway. Study the config files to see how that integrates all the various bits and pieces.) –  Tonny Aug 8 '12 at 18:23
    
Cheers, yeah I am just doing it to try and learn about networking and IP tables for the sake of it, I know that a lot of the commands between distro's are almost identical but I hear there are subtle differences which is why I would like to stick with Ubuntu so I don't get confused in the future when using it. –  Alex Hope O'Connor Aug 8 '12 at 22:47

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