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I have RedHat Linux on which there are some softwares installed like:

  • Standard C++ Library 33-3.2.3-47.3
  • WebSphere MQ Client 6.0.2.6
  • IBM Global Security Kit 7.0.4.11
  • IBM Key Management Tool 6.0 or above
  • Tivoli Data Exchange 4.4.0.0

I want to know if there is a way to get this list by executing some command from the Command line, such that when I execute the command, it prompts me with whatever is there and if anything is missing then it can be installed

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How is this tool you propose supposed to know what is missing? –  womble Aug 8 '12 at 12:26

2 Answers 2

If you know the RPM names for all of those packages, you can use the verify (-V) option to the rpm command to identify missing files or what has been modified since it was installed.

For example:

rpm -V compat-libstdc++-33
rpm -V gsk7bas

If nothing has changed, the command will produce no output. However, if a change is detected, you'll receive a report like this:

# rpm -V openssh-server
S.5....T.  c /etc/ssh/sshd_config

From the rpm man page: "Verifying a package compares information about the installed files in the package with information about the files taken from the package metadata stored in the rpm database. Among other things, verifying compares the size, MD5 sum, permissions, type, owner and group of each file."

If you don't know the RPM names, try this:

rpm -qa --queryformat="%{NAME}\t%{VENDOR}\n" | egrep -v "Red Hat"
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Also how can I check the Linux SCB Standard Build AS4.0 i.e. teh base OS. Can that also be verified using rpm? –  Dorothy Aug 10 '12 at 7:39
    
I'm not sure what that means. Are you asking how to check if the system is a RHEL 4AS build? cat /etc/redhat-release. –  skohrs Aug 10 '12 at 13:13
    
Yeah I want to check what is the base Operating System is AS4.0 (Linux SCB Standard Build). Which command can I use to check this? –  Dorothy Aug 12 '12 at 9:01

Try rpm -qa to get a list of installed packages

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