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I have been reading many posts on serverfault as well as on other sites regarding all these.

What I understand is, Multiple A records(round-robin dns) can be used for both :

I would like to make sure my assumptions/findings are right. So let me know please.....

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have you got your answer or not if u satisfy with these answer then u should accept by clicking on right mark. –  user128296 Sep 8 '12 at 12:01
    
No, thats not an answser to my question. That could be an answer to "How can I do Load Balancing?". But my question is, is that possible with DNS round-robin ? I think its very clear from description, where I have talked only about DNS round-robin. –  user1089770 Nov 23 '12 at 10:02

2 Answers 2

If you want real load balancing for web server's than you should think about Haproxy . It has high efficiency using reverse proxy and failover system (keep alive & Heartbeat) Haproxy load balancer will work as a front end server for your web server.

To know more about Haproxy you should read http://haproxy.1wt.eu/download/1.2/doc/haproxy-en.txt and http://www.howtoforge.com/high-availability-load-balancer-haproxy-heartbeat-fedora8

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In Load-Sharing we share the traffic across multiple paths, even if it is in an unequal fashion. Load balancing is used to achieve network efficiency. It distributes the traffic in an even manner across a network which has multiple-paths, this is done to get optimal resource utilization, maximize throughput, and minimize response time. So these two are really different things. round-robin when used with DNS(domain name server) is a method af load balancing although it has a drawback that it does not reports automatic failover of a node,even then techniques exist by which round robin technique can be improved.

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