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I'm using VirtualBox 4.1.22 and have a Opensuse 12.1 VM. When I clone it without any changing (even not MAC address), the cloned version doens't work propperly. It boot for a long time and give message in terminal like this Welcome to emergency mode. Use "systemctl default" or ^D to enter default mode. Give root password for login:. When I ran this I shut down the original one to avoid any conflict but it doesnl't help. If I change to default mode, it just reboot and give that message again. When I change some network setting via Yast and save, it will reboot immediately. I tried to run the cloned version on another physical machine but still got the same problem. The cloning is suppose to copy every thing in the VM, and the cloned version should just work exactly as original one does. I really don't understand why it just won't work.

What wrong did I do? Any one have similar problem? I saw some people complain about hard drive UUID problem. I didn't got the HDD error but it simply doesn't work.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

At a guess, /etc/fstab is referencing disk by-id, and the Id's have changed as part of the clone process. This may cause the problems you're seeing. If this is in fact the case, you can verify this through emergency mode.

  • Log in as asked
  • Examine fstab for values
  • Examine the contents of /dev/disk/by-id to make sure the values match
    • If different, adjust /etc/fstab to match
    • If the same, then I'm wrong.
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Also, check the bootloader configuration in /boot/grub/grub.cfg It to references the UUIDs of the drives. –  Chris Nava Sep 18 '12 at 14:02
    
Yes it's the problem of /etc/fstab, it doesn't match with the ones found in /dev/, change fstab and it solves the problm. –  Tony Sep 21 '12 at 2:30

On an OpenSUSE system check /dev/disk/ for by-id, by-uuid ..etc and compare it with the /etc/fstab and/or /boot/grub/grub.cfg as mentioned above!

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