Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For proper TPROXY support I was looking for a STABLE Linux kernel of at least version 3.2.30. Do they want us to upgrade to version 3 of the kernel? And is that compatible with CentOS 6?

share|improve this question
    
The version number was bumped purely because the end numbers were getting a bit high. No other reason. Linus himself has said words to this affect. –  Sirex Sep 17 '12 at 23:31
1  
@Sirex is right, but to make sure you have access to bugfixes and keep the management of the updates simple, you maybe should choose a distribution with a current kernel. –  Thomas Berger Oct 12 '12 at 19:53
add comment

3 Answers

2.6.34.13 is the newest kernel, but it is not the highest version. Try the web directory instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Google kernel 2.6.39, it exists. –  dongle26 Sep 17 '12 at 23:32
1  
@dongle26: Yes, it does. It is older than 2.6.34.13. The 2.6.34 line is being maintained separately. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 17 '12 at 23:33
    
Of course it doesn't. It is being maintained separately. The web directory contains the dates the kernel versions were released. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 17 '12 at 23:35
    
I really doubt that 2.6.34.13 contains features and patches found in 2.6.39. –  dongle26 Sep 17 '12 at 23:37
    
No one claimed that it did. /pub/linux/kernel/v2.6/longterm/v2.6.34/linux-2.6.34.13.tar.gz: 20-Aug-2012 /pub/linux/kernel/v2.6/linux-2.6.39.4.tar.gz: 03-Aug-2011 –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Sep 17 '12 at 23:41
add comment

If you need 2.6.39 you can use Oracle Linux, which is an RHEL clone that provides its own kernel (which just happens to be 2.6.39). I've used it in a couple of places to get driver support that wasn't present in 2.6.32.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is 2.6.39 not listed on the front page? I don't want to use an unstable kernel. –  dongle26 Sep 17 '12 at 23:31
1  
Because it hasn't been updated in more than six months. This was answered in the kernel.org FAQ. –  Michael Hampton Sep 17 '12 at 23:34
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, CentOS 6 supports running 3.2.30. Haven't tested it much, however.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.