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I own 2 server with Windows 2008 R2, both DC. The first one is of course the Primary DC (with all FSMO). What I would like to do is ro dcdemote the 2nd DC, remove it from domain and replace the Windows 2008 r2 with 2012. I will then rejoin this 2nd DC (with the new 2012 server) to domain and dcpromo it (Server Management). After this is a new DC I would like to temporary transfer all the FSMO to this server, while I'm doing the same operation on what is actually the Primary DC.

Is this a stupid solution? What I would like to do is a clean installation, I don't want to upgrade directly those systems.

Suggestions? Ideas? Thanks, Mauro

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This is the typical path when upgrading domain controllers in the domain. You cannot do an in-place upgrade anyway. Do you have any specific concerns? As is, it is not that much of a question to answer. –  the-wabbit Sep 22 '12 at 19:23
    
Thanks dude. Well, actually... I would like to know how to transfer FSMO from primary DC (2008R2) to a new DC (Win 2012), and then bring them back to the primary DC, in the while upgraded from 2008R2 to 2012. –  Mauro Sep 22 '12 at 23:43

1 Answer 1

This is the typical path when upgrading domain controllers in the domain. Contrary to my previous claim in the comment, there is an in-place upgrade path from Windows Server 2008 (R2). The procedure is quite similar to introducing a 2008 DC into a 2003 domain, the best place to start is the Technet documentation. Check the prerequisites (forest functional level, recommended hotfix when running under Hyper-V) and follow the walk-throughs from the official documentation or third parties.

Transferring FSMO levels is just the same as has been before - just use ntdsutil from either DC.

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