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We are running a win 2008 core host in a HyperV role. We have expanded the logical drive on a RAID 1+0 array belonging to the server, as we needed more space.

We have two data partitions D: and E: I want to expand them both so they use all space, and are equally sized. There is data on all partitions, although E is not in live use (so files can be moved and copied from it.

Current: Current partition map

What I want- temporary Partition (F:) at end of drive:

Proposed map with offset and new part at end

I am going to create a temporary partition F: so I can move the files from E: onto it, then delete E:, expand D: to the desired size, then rename F: to E: To do this I need to create F: from the end of the drive, ie. have unused space between E: and F:

tl;dr How do I create a partition with a large offset in Windows server?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems this could not be done without powering off the sever, or purchasing a program to do it. Solution in the end was to copy files from E: to other server, remove E: Expand D: and recreate E: to fill space, and copy files back.

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He easiest way to do this would be to create a partition as a spacer the size of the offset and then create the partition at the end. Then delete the spacer. This can be done in the UI or command-line.

You can also use diskpart.exe. See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/300415 and http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc766465(v=WS.10).aspx. Diskpart supports an offset=n parameter in bytes.

However I can see that you may have another problem. You are using a basic disk, and are attempting to create the fifth (5) partition on the disk. Basic disks are a legacy format and only permit a maximum of four (4) partitions. You would need to convert to a dynamic disk with simple volumes to add this new partition.

Also note that moving to a FAT volume will destroy any NTFS features on the moved files. I.e. You will loose any ACLs on your files.

Hope this helps.

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Sorry, just saw a typo there. I wont use Fat, I meant "(F:) at". It is an array so I'm not sure if the partition issues will appear. This is a good idea though thank you. –  Rqomey Oct 5 '12 at 9:11
    
I tried how you suggested, unfortunately windows had created 4 primary partitions, and extending one would not have worked. Thank you for the pointers tho! –  Rqomey Oct 5 '12 at 15:17

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