Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running a Centos VM in VMWare Fusion 5.x. The VM is running a file transfer server and the files being sent are stored on a disk shared from the host, /mnt/hgfs/Aspera. It looks like the file transfers are taking up space on the root volume.

I spent some time last night resizing the VM disk from 20 GB to 50 GB using Gparted and it filled up again this morning, presumably because people are using the transfer server. How do I mount the other volume such that it doesn't use VM's disk space?

Here's my command outputs:

[root@aspera /]# df -h
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda2              48G   45G   16M 100% /
tmpfs                 935M  300K  935M   1% /dev/shm
/dev/sda1             291M   58M  218M  21% /boot
/dev/sr0              128M  128M     0 100% /media/GParted-live

root@aspera /]# du . | sort -nr | head -10
du: cannot access `./proc/40852/task/40852/fd/4': No such file or directory
du: cannot access `./proc/40852/task/40852/fdinfo/4': No such file or directory
du: cannot access `./proc/40852/fd/4': No such file or directory
du: cannot access `./proc/40852/fdinfo/4': No such file or directory
46778741    .
42760076    ./mnt
42760072    ./mnt/hgfs
42760068    ./mnt/hgfs/Aspera
33393104    ./mnt/hgfs/Aspera/85402436-7f17-43f7-bc2d-a46ebcc7cd81
33393100    ./mnt/hgfs/Aspera/85402436-7f17-43f7-bc2d-a46ebcc7cd81/PKG - LWS ProRes Files
1977804 ./usr
1800596 ./mnt/hgfs/Aspera/b3f4f3b5-bb22-457d-baa2-adda320a6ecb
1800592 ./mnt/hgfs/Aspera/b3f4f3b5-bb22-457d-baa2-adda320a6ecb/PKG - MAM_VFX_136_100812
1800588 ./mnt/hgfs/Aspera/b3f4f3b5-bb22-457d-baa2-adda320a6ecb/PKG - MAM_VFX_136_100812/MAM_VFX_136_100812

[root@aspera /]# du --max-depth=1
42760076    ./mnt
212896  ./var
14024   ./sbin
660620  ./home
544 ./dev
130082  ./media
24748   ./lib64
7680    ./bin
16  ./lost+found
1977804 ./usr
14504   ./tmp
236256  ./lib
0   ./sys
48851   ./boot
34240   ./etc
432 ./root
655928  ./opt
4   ./selinux
4   ./srv
du: cannot access `./proc/40807/task/40807/fd/4': No such file or directory
du: cannot access `./proc/40807/task/40807/fdinfo/4': No such file or directory
du: cannot access `./proc/40807/fd/4': No such file or directory
du: cannot access `./proc/40807/fdinfo/4': No such file or directory
0   ./proc
46778713    
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What's odd is not that the files are taking up space on the root FS, but that you believe that they're going to a disc mounted from the vmware host. Nothing you've so far shown makes me think that any such volume is mounted on /mnt/hgfs/Aspera. Could you say why you think it is?

Edit: fair enough. I'm no vmware expert, but this link suggests to me that the storage isn't automatically mounted just because it's available to the guest.

You might try following their advice - it looks pretty linux-generic, not Gentoo-specific - and seeing if that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
"In a Linux virtual machine, shared folders appear under /mnt/hgfs. So the shared folder in this example would appear as /mnt/hgfs/Test files." according to vmware.com/support/ws4/doc/running_sharefold_ws.html –  Kevin London Oct 11 '12 at 16:26
1  
Just do a quick test and touch a file in /mnt/hgfs/Aspera and confirm that the new file shows up on the host. Also, try turning off the file sharing, reboot the VM and see what the disk usage is at. If it's still at 100%, go check and see if /mnt/hgfs/Aspera is still accessible even after turning sharing off. –  Safado Oct 11 '12 at 16:41
    
You were both right. It looks like the mount point was no longer properly mounted and it was writing to the root volume instead of a shared drive. I'm going to use NFS shares instead, I think. Thank you for the help. –  Kevin London Oct 11 '12 at 17:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.