Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have an existing Windows Server 2003 domain and several other computers are on that network (i.e., we have Windows Server 2008 member servers, other Windows Server 2003 member servers, Windows 7 and XP workstations, and even a Windows 2000 Server member server). Everything has been working fine until this first Windows Server 2012 server.

We need to add this Windows Server 2012 server as a member server to our exist domain. We do not want it to be a domain controller, not even a backup domain controller - just another server on the network.

When we try to add it to the domain using the standard Computer Name/Domain Changes dialog from System Properties, it can never find the domain controller. We get the message "The specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted." Of course, the domain is online and all networking is fine, and we're using Administrator (domain and local Administrator user accounts), but ... nothing.

Is there some "trick" to adding a Windows Server 2012 server as a member server to an existing domain?

What else can I try?

share|improve this question
2  
Is the server configured to use your AD DNS servers for DNS? –  joeqwerty Oct 12 '12 at 16:30
2  
"We do not want it to be a domain controller, not even a backup domain controller - just another server on the network." - There hasn't been backup domain controllers since the NT4 days. I know this isn't relevant to your question, but if you're working with AD, this is a major misunderstanding that can lead to headaches down the road. This Q&A should give you a solid overview of AD and how DCs interact with workstations and member servers. –  MDMarra Oct 12 '12 at 17:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

We get the message "The specified domain either does not exist or could not be contacted."

Check DNS. Rule #1 for all AD problems is "Check DNS." Rule #2 is "If it's not DNS, you're in trouble."

From the command prompt are you able to ping or do an nslookup of the FQDN of your AD domain? I'm betting you just have the 2012 server's DNS list misconfigured in the network adapter properties.

There's no "trick" to making 2012 a member server, troubleshoot this the same way that you would 2003 or 2008.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for rules #1 and #2. –  Massimo Oct 12 '12 at 17:28
    
I can't take all of the credit. I said rule #1 in Server Fault Chat yesterday and @Zypher said rule #2 right after. :) –  MDMarra Oct 12 '12 at 17:29

In my case I had to disable IPv6 on the Server 2012 i was trying to promote. This took a while to figure out as I was troubleshooting ipv4 and not finding any problem. Once it was forced to use IPv4 there was no problem.

share|improve this answer
2  
You really don't want to disable IPv6 unless you're absolutely sure removing it won't cause other problems. –  kce May 8 '13 at 16:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.