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I have a Samsung spinpoint f3 hard drive, with a BF41-00278A pcb board. A case fan shorted and it shorted my motherboard along with the all hard drives. Nothing else failed, I got a new motherboard and now back in order.

The hard drive however completely died. A terrible photo shows the chip with silver stuff on it. Anyway, I ordered the exact same PCB from the internet, put it together and it is still completely dead. No sign of life at all.

The PCB's have the same model etc, there is one chip that is the same but made by different manufactures. The actual pcb looks the same. The contacts on the actual pcb don't look completely clean, but I've seen this on other hard drives, cannot believe this would cause it to be dead.

I have heard ROM chips need swapping on Samsung boards, is this the case when a drive is completely dead?

What should I do next?

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closed as off topic by Ward, Magellan, Shane Madden, Scott Pack, Iain Oct 19 '12 at 7:57

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Either forget your data or send it to a good recovery service like Kroll (and be prepared to pay a lot). They will likely try to put the spindles in another drive and try to read it, but they use a clean room for this.

Hard disks are generally not repairable by a user.

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+1 for Hard disks are generally not repairable by a user. -- The only reason to try it yourself if if you are desperate for the data, but can't afford the price of professional recovery. (Or have a very old disk. 20 MB-ish (yes, M, not G). –  Hennes Oct 17 '12 at 17:08
    
i dont get why this is off topic? It was in a server. and I was hoping that i could fix it myself. –  Sc0rian Oct 19 '12 at 15:07

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