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Is there a way to change an automatic DNS record to a staic one, so that it doesn't get deleted by scavenging?

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This server does run a DHCP service as well, but I want to change some dynamically assigned ip address to static (as they are static on the servers).

I know you can delete a record then re-create it, which works, but I'm just hoping for an easier way.

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You're confusing some things. Do you want to change some IP addresses to static, or would you like to change some A records to static? They're two entirely separate things that don't have much to do with each other. –  MDMarra Oct 22 '12 at 23:12
    
The 2nd option, I want to change A records to static –  Mint Oct 23 '12 at 1:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Let me edit this to be completely clear. Static A records and static IP addresses are two completely unrelated things. It is normal to have machines with static IPs have dynamic DNS A records. You should not change this unless you have a compelling reason.

Is there a way to change an automatic DNS record to a staic one?

So that it doesn't get deleted by scavenging.

You shouldn't have to do this. If legitimate records are being scavenged, then you have configured scavenging incorrectly. You should read this link. It's for 2003, but the concepts about scavenging and refresh intervals are unchanged.

This server does run a DHCP service as well, which is fine, but I want to change some dynamically assigned ip address to static (as they are static on the client end. e.g. servers)

If the IPs are static on the servers, then there's nothing more you need to do. A static IP is a static IP.


I think part of your misconception is that you misunderstand how DNS records are updated. Yes, you can have DHCP update your DNS records using the DnsUpdateProxy group, but this is bad bad bad and it's not the standard configuration, so unless you've explicitly configured this (which I'm betting you haven't), then that's not how it's being done.

By default, an computer will send a DDNS record update to its primary DNS server when the adapter received an IP address and each day after that. The adapter registers itself and the kind of record that is created is a dynamic one. If it is being scavenged, then either your scavenging window is too small or you need to shorten the interval at which computers register themselves.

Having a static IP and having a static A record are two completely different things. In almost all cases, you don't want to create static A records for hosts that self-register. You only want to do this for hosts that don't, like *nix servers on a DNS server that only accepts trusted updates from AD clients or for something like a secondary interface with a dedicated IP that's hosting a website.

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I haven't noticed DNS records being deleted yet, but thats because I only just enabled DNS scavenging, I was asking about the static A records in order to prevent any loss as I found that there were several servers that weren't marked as static on the DNS server. (but these servers have been setup with a static IP address on each server) –  Mint Oct 23 '12 at 1:13
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Please re-read my answer. Static IPs and static A records are two completely unrelated things. It's completely normal to have dynamic A records for servers with static IPs. As long as you have scavenging/aging configured correctly these records will not be scavenged. Really, read the article I linked to. –  MDMarra Oct 23 '12 at 1:15
    
When you say "by default, a computer will send a DDNS record update to its primary DNS server" you really ought to be clearer that you are talking primarily about Windows environments and that that's not a universal behavior by any means. –  Michael McNally Oct 24 '12 at 23:02
    
@MichaelMcNally it's how Windows clients behave and this question is about Windows. –  MDMarra Oct 24 '12 at 23:07

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