Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a two part question:

1) Which server roles or other functions built into Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 will also install SQL along with them?

2) Since no management tools also get installed, how can the instance in SQL be managed? Specifically how would you limit the memory that this instance is using up?

I'm asking this question because when you search pretty much anywhere, all the answers assume you installed MS SQL manually.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Windows System Resource Manager, Windows Server Update Services, and Active Directory Rights Management installs the "Windows Internal Database" engine, which is a flavor of SQL Server (think 2005).

I haven't tried this myself, but you could probably download the SQL Server 2008 Express tools and connect to the engine with the Express management console. Should be easy enough to test.

Windows Internal Database Overview
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc754405.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
I'm thinking that the Windows Internal Database is the process I'm seeing. It does indeed lead to a folder with the 2005 version of SQL. I'm wondering if anybody has successfully installed the 2008 Express version of the tools and connected to be able to restrict memory usage. I would also think it could be controlled by a registry key too? –  Bryansix Oct 25 '12 at 16:24
    
It's probably in the sys.configurations view/table. You can see it usually with SELECT * FROM sys.configurations ORDER BY [name] msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187997.aspx –  Greg Askew Oct 25 '12 at 19:09

There is no built in installer for SQL inside of Windows Server. You will need to purchase a full version of SQL Server, or download SQL Express.

Like Greg said, there is the Windows internal database that will get installed if you installed Sharepoint Services, but isn't equal. SQL Express is free, and much more flexible.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.