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I was just wondering if anyone had an idea if the following values for a server room are acceptable or what needed to be changed.

In the room the temperature is 17c with RH of 38% and Dewpoint of 2.2c

Why would my Dew point be at 2.2c when my temp and humidity are in around the correct values?

Or are they totally off causing my dew point to also be really low?

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What's wrong with the dewpoint? It looks perfectly reasonable. –  Michael Hampton Nov 3 '12 at 15:03
    
oh is that reasonable? just from whatever i was reading online i was seeing much higher values –  Dani Cela Nov 3 '12 at 15:06
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Totally and completely depends on what's in your server room. I'm sure that anything from 5C to 55C would be just fine if you have nothing installed in the server room. –  Magellan Nov 3 '12 at 15:12
    
Oh ok, good point. Thanks for the help guys. –  Dani Cela Nov 3 '12 at 15:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The dew point is a measure of how cold the air would have to get right now before water started spontaneously condensing out of it - or how cold a piece of equipment brought into the room would have to be in order to condense water on its surface.

Naturally, having water on things is a bad idea in a server room, so you don't want the dew point to get too close to ambient (ie, the RH wants to stay fairly low), and you don't want to bring cold equipment into a server room with a fairly high dew point.

Wikipedia's article on the dew point suggests that for 17C and 40%RH, the dew point is about 3C, so I think your meter's probably telling the truth. And from the above, I think that's a perfectly fine dew point as well, so don't worry.

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Awesome, thanks for that info. Glad to hear everything is good. –  Dani Cela Nov 3 '12 at 18:06

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