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I have connected to my remote server using the FQDN machine name: server1.mydomain.com, one day later I cannot any more connect using server1.mydomain.com but I am still able to connect using the dynamic public IP address. Is there something to configure to make RDP follow dynamic dns?

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When it doesn't work, have you tried pinging the fqdn? Or doing nslookup? Or clearing your dns cache? –  longneck Nov 7 '12 at 12:28
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The server doesn't know anything about what dynamic ip address is being used to NAT/forward incoming RDP sessions to it. The server only knows about the ip address that's assigned directly to it's NIC and it only knows about what port it's listening on for incoming RDP sessions. Everything else is external to the server. This is a DNS or router or firewall problem. –  joeqwerty Nov 7 '12 at 14:51
    
@longneck, It just worked now. Before, I succeded pinging the fqdn and resolves the latest IP, but have never tried clearing dns cache. Clearing dns cache is something new for me... –  Sami-L Nov 7 '12 at 15:01
    
@joeqwerty, since it makes some delay to work, do I have to enable dns role to configure something there ? –  Sami-L Nov 7 '12 at 15:05
    
You're using the public FQDN to connect to the server from the outside, right? –  joeqwerty Nov 7 '12 at 15:14

1 Answer 1

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This has nothing to do with your server needing to follow dynamic DNS or having the DNS role installed.

When the IP address changes, it takes time for your computer to realize the address has changed because it caches the results of DNS queries. You can clear this cache by running ipconfig /flushdns from an elevated command prompt.

Also, DNS servers between you and your dynamic DNS provider can cache their responses. Your dynamic DNS provider can set the length of time that downstream DNS servers are supposed to cache DNS entries, but not everyone obeys those values. Therefore, you could be at the mercy of their cache configuration.

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Sorry for the delay to give a new feed back, I had to wait to verify what happens when the public IP address changes, As the client updater software recommanded by my dns supplier has no logs, I could not know what realy happens when IP changes. and since this is my first time using a dns client updater, I could not know how this kind of tools works on the local machine, Finaly, I just discovered that the client software runs dns updates only if it is open. –  Sami-L Nov 10 '12 at 18:58
    
So I launched a new google for a dns client software that could run as a Windows service, then fall on this: http://freedns.afraid.org/scripts/freedns.clients.php –  Sami-L Nov 10 '12 at 18:58

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