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Here's what I've got in my small office:

- a static public IP address 
- 8 IP subnet configured like this
      xx.xx.xx.16 - network
      xx.xx.xx.17 - gateway
      xx.xx.xx.18 - 22 usable
      xx.xx.xx.23 - broadcast
              /29 - CIDR number
- an ASUS RT-N16 running DD-WRT v24-sp2 (08/12/10) mini - build 14929 
- internet server1 xx.xx.xx.18
- internet server2 xx.xx.xx.19
- various printers, computers, tablets, etc on 192.168.xx.xx

I need to route internet traffic to the two servers and NAT all of the other devices. I've searched high and low on the DD-WRT site and found nothing on how to do this. It doesn't seem like it should be hard, but I am stumped.

11/12/12 - 10:30 am
Here are the answers to your questions:
What internet traffic do you need to forward to the two servers? Are you talking HTTP, SMTP, etc.?
The two servers support different web development environments. They both need to have the usual internet ports open, HTTP, HTTPS, SMTP, etc. The two servers are actually virtual machines running in a VMmare ESXi environment. My current clients have different server environments, Linux vs Windows, hence the need for different servers.

could you clarify your ip address block/scheme.
My ISP has given me a total of 9 IP addresses. The static public IP I speak of is from a completely different IP range than the block of 8. If you were to ping the static IP the reply would come from my DD-WRT router. My ISP is routing traffic destined for the xx.xx.xx.18 through xx.xx.xx.22 range to that address. My router has to be configured to send it on to the correct network in my office. When things are working as they should a ping to xx.xx.xx.18 would be replied to by the server configured with that address.

The 192.168.xx.xx NATed network is for all of the other devices in the office that do not need routable IP addresses. Those are the printers, computers, etc, etc used in the office.

Please provide more detail; presumably "xx.xx.xx" refers to public IP addresses, not RFC1918 space.
xx.xx.xx.xx is referring to public IP addresses. I am also using RFC1918 space as well because, honestly, my printer doesn't need to connect to the internet ;-) but my laptop does. I should have put the CIDR number /29 in the original config info above, that's fixed now.

Pretty sure I'd just say "no" if someone asked me to set up a piece of SOHO gear running DD-WRT in a professional capacity.
What I'm doing is the very definition of SOHO and I couldn't agree more and maybe someday there will be a budget for nicer network equipment, but for now it's what the business can afford. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Lastly, I know some of the things I've said are not best practice, for example replying to a ping from the internet, running Windows on anything but I don't want those things to be a distraction.

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What internet traffic do you need to forward to the two servers? Are you talking HTTP, SMTP, etc.? Also, could you clarify your ip address block/scheme. You state you've got "a static public IP address", but then you go on to list an "8 IP subnet" which sounds like a block assigned to you by your ISP, then you go on to state "various printers, computers, tablets, etc on 192.168.xx.xx " which sounds like your internal addressing scheme. So have you been allocated an 8 public ip address block from your ISP or have you been allocated a single public ip address from your ISP? –  joeqwerty Nov 21 '12 at 2:33
    
I have removed my answer, someone else will have to help you. –  SpacemanSpiff Nov 21 '12 at 2:39
    
Pretty sure I'd just say "no" if someone asked me to set up a piece of SOHO gear running DD-WRT in a professional capacity. Looks like it's a little late for you to do that now, but something to consider for next time... –  HopelessN00b Nov 21 '12 at 5:26
    
Please provide more detail; presumably "xx.xx.xx" refers to public IP addresses, not RFC1918 space. Nonetheless, prefix sizes in the CIDR notation format would be useful to determine how to resolve this. routing and NAT are two very different things. –  Olipro Nov 21 '12 at 10:06
    
@joeqwerty I have answered your questions up above. Thanks for your help –  jsigned Nov 21 '12 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

You need to do one of two things:

  1. You need to setup a DMZ and put the servers in the DMZ opening only the ports that need to be exposed to the Internet. Some DD-WRT firmware have DMZ section for this.
  2. Or the easier way to do this would be to put all your internal devices on the same subnet and port forward the ports you need to the servers while still allowing the internal devices to access the servers.
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Thanks for your response, but a DMZ only forwards traffic to a specified NAT'ed IP address. I need the router to forward ALL data from the internet to a specific non-NAT'ed route-able IP. Bottom line, I highly doubt that DD-WRT can really do anything more than the factory firmware. –  jsigned Dec 13 '12 at 20:47

Well, after weeks of research I have come to the conclusion that DD-WRT isn't capable of what I need to do. Beyond the typical home user stuff, nobody knows how to configure it. Before this DD-WRT router I've used several routers from different manufacturers using different firmware. DD-WRT has more whistles and bells, but basically it isn't any better than the factory firmwares I've used in the past. I could make the argument that it's worse because of the complexity of getting it to work in the first place.

So the answers is, DD-WRT can not do it. Or, if it can nobody that knows the answer is posting the helps on the net.

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