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We are in a domain (lets call it "mydomain"). Whenever I try to resolve a name, (lets say I try to access serverfault.com), I can see that serverfault.com.mydomain is tested first, timeout then, serverfault.com is tested and resolved. So most of time when I try to reach something outside the domain, I have to wait 2 sec timeout before being able to reach it. What did I do wrong when I configured my domain?

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That's perfectly normal. Without the trailing dot (.) Windows will append the primary DNS suffix to the query and then use devolution to strip the primary DNS suffix. You can verify this by running nslookup in debug mode (set debug) and then querying for serverfault.com.

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that's indeed what i observed with nslookup and -debug. but is there a way to prevent this order when i use my browser, for example ? –  Proviste Nov 28 '12 at 20:29
    
I believe you can disable it via GPO and/or in the registry. Why is it a concern for you? - technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee683928(v=ws.10).aspx –  joeqwerty Nov 28 '12 at 20:33
    
well it's a concern because whenever i try to reach a website through my browser, i have to wait much longer to access it (a least the first the name is resolved.) but i agree, it's not a big deal, but i'm trying to improve the global "feeling" on my network... –  Proviste Nov 28 '12 at 20:39
    
Well I'm assuming Microsoft designed it this way for very good reasons and disabling or changing the default behavior can only lead to trouble. –  joeqwerty Nov 28 '12 at 20:41
    
i agree. if it's the normal behavior, i won't try to change it. –  Proviste Nov 28 '12 at 20:44

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