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related question: for setting locale in ubuntu what does the LANGUAGE environment variable mean

for setting locale my existing Ubuntu 12.04 server has LANGUAGE as en_US:
And I can set it to en_US:utf8 as well. What is the difference ?

existing configuration is, which i found by typing locale

LANG=en_US.utf8
LANGUAGE=en_US:
LC_CTYPE="en_US.utf8"
LC_NUMERIC="en_US.utf8"
LC_TIME="en_US.utf8"
LC_COLLATE="en_US.utf8"
LC_MONETARY="en_US.utf8"
LC_MESSAGES="en_US.utf8"
LC_PAPER="en_US.utf8"
LC_NAME="en_US.utf8"
LC_ADDRESS="en_US.utf8"
LC_TELEPHONE="en_US.utf8"
LC_MEASUREMENT="en_US.utf8"
LC_IDENTIFICATION="en_US.utf8"
LC_ALL=

EDIT: right now LANGUAGE is en_US:. notice the colon at the end

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marked as duplicate by mdpc, MichelZ, dawud, Jenny D, HBruijn Jun 21 '14 at 9:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

en_US uses ASCII encoding, and en_US.utf8 uses UTF8 (Unicode) encoding. Since UTF8 is a superset of ASCII, it's the default, and a good choice unless you have a specific reason to avoid Unicode.

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3  
is en_US: the same as en_US? The first one has colon at the end – deepak Dec 11 '12 at 6:50
    
Yes, as far as I know, the colon has no significance. – 1.618 Dec 11 '12 at 12:28

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