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I'm currently trying to setup a Tigase cluster on Amazon EC2 instances in a VPC and I'm having troubles getting it to work due to the hostnames of the instances not being "full DNS names". According to the Tigase documentation:

Please note the proper DNS configuration is critical for the cluster to work correctly. Make sure the 'hostname' command returns a full DNS name on each cluster node.

Can anyone explain what a full DNS name is and how I can set my instances to use one? Currently my instances get a default hostname of the form "ip-10-0-0-20".

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Are you talking about a Fully Qualified Domain name? eg: hostname.domain.com –  ServerFaulter Dec 9 '12 at 8:23

1 Answer 1

It sounds like you're using the "hostname" command on whatever OS you've got running on your EC2 instance. This isn't going to give you the FQDN. Instead, check the instance properties/details page in the AWS console. IIRC, you should see an internet FQDN as well as an internal FQDN (i.e. for instance-to-instance communication).

I'm not familiar with Tigase, but if it's picky about the guest OS knowing it's own FQDN, you can specify the domain portion in the resolv.conf file.

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I'm actually running the instances within a VPC which from what I found on this site (docs.amazonwebservices.com/AmazonVPC/latest/UserGuide/…) EC2 in VPC receive an unresolvable host name that AWS assigns. I'm wondering if setting up a custom option set with a domain name and using AmazonProvidedDNS would work? –  Firefly Dec 10 '12 at 22:43
    
You could try that... or you could try creating a new EC2 instance and set it up as a DNS server using the software of your choice. Then just create records for the instances functioning as Tigase nodes. –  1.618 Dec 11 '12 at 2:54

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