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I am getting myself into linux administration and was wondering if anyone had any good suggestions for apache related books. Administration, configuration, mod_rewrite etc

I searched amazon for apache and most of the books are from 2004 or 2002.

So any good books out there? Thanks

PS: I have apache 2.2.11

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As suggested by John Gardeniers, the apache manual is an invaluable reference httpd.apache.org/docs/2.2 –  Frenchie Jul 26 '09 at 13:54
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4 Answers 4

You might find Apache 2 Pocket Reference useful, as that's fairly recent. Anything that deals with apache 2.x will be fine, as there's very little difference between 2.0 and 2.2 other than authentication configuration. With that in mind, I'd suggest either Apache: The Definitive Guide or Pro Apache as Oreilly and Apress are both good publishers. You might also get good mileage from The Definitive Guide to Apache mod_rewrite and/or Apache Cookbook. I should point out that I've not read any of these books, but have read others from the same publishers. Oreilly are the go-to publisher for technical books. They are targeted at geeks and cover from the basics to quite some depth, unlike some like "Learn foo in 24 hours" or "Idiots Guide to Bar", which lack content.

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I suggest you start with Apache's own manual and then, if you still feel the need, simply Google for anything you wish to study further. As you've already discovered, books tend to be out of date before they leave the printers.

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For mod_rewrite, I would start with learning regular expressions first if you don't know already know them. Most of the most books, I would think ( I know The Definitive Guide David mentioned does does), expect you to already know regular expressions.

Here is a nice StackOverFlow question about Learning Regular Expressions.

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The apache foundation has quite a good guide on their website, IMO - no need for anything additional.

And two more questions - what does apache have to do with ubuntu, and what does ubuntu have to do with being a server?

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Many people run ubuntu on servers. –  David Pashley Jul 26 '09 at 14:28
    
I run apache on servers which run ubuntu, seems relevant. Seriously though, there are differences in the apache default setup in debian/ubuntu - (sites|mods)-(enabled|avaliable) etc. so it makes perfect sense to say you're running ubuntu server so that people answering have more background information on which to base their recommendation. –  theotherreceive Jul 26 '09 at 14:42
    
@ David Pashley which doesn't make it a good practice. @ theotherreceive that's understood, and IMO Debian is a very good distro, quite enterprise-class. But Ubuntu, being in the hands of Canonical, and based on the ubstable branch of Debian - never for my servers. –  dyasny Jul 26 '09 at 17:14
    
@dyasny - What do you use on your servers? –  AntonioCS Jul 27 '09 at 10:28
    
@antoniocs: lately I mostly use RHEL and derivatives. But I've used Debian and SuSE as well. I have run into quite a few problems before running unstable software, and that's not only due to bugs popping up everywhere, but also because there are so many bugfixes, the server is always stuck updating instead of serving its purpose –  dyasny Jul 27 '09 at 11:48
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