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can anyone bring out the difference between what is expected from a Data Center Manager and a Data Center Administrator?

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closed as not a real question by kce, voretaq7 Jan 10 '13 at 17:33

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I suspect it depends on who's paying them. Employers usually get to define roles; sysadmin Q&A sites, not so much. –  MadHatter Jan 10 '13 at 17:17
    
This isn't a bad question, but it's not a good question for Server Fault -- Like MadHatter said the title applied to a given role varies pretty widely depending on where you work. Brent's answer covers the general division though - In a place that has both titles one is usually "management" and the other is a grunt that actually does the work. –  voretaq7 Jan 10 '13 at 17:35
    
To add to @voretaq7 you may have better luck with posting this question on Workplace.SE, but check their FAQ first to make sure it is acceptable. –  Brent Pabst Jan 10 '13 at 19:40

1 Answer 1

Titles vary by every place you might work...

Regardless, the DC Manager is probably responsible for the entire data center, has multiple supervisors and others below them. May only be responsible for certain aspects of the DC such as only cabinets and servers, or could actually be responsible for the entire facility, much like a General Manager type of position. Again this all varies.

The DC administrator is someone who would report to one of the aforementioned supervisors or managers. This person is often responsible for actually making changes to things, monitoring devices and deploying new stuff.

Again, this all varies across the board but should give you a good separation of responsibilities from a general view point.

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