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I am new to EC2 and please help me in understanding this better.

When I created an EC2 instance it immediately got a name

ec2-67-201-11-147.compute-1.amazonaws.com and I could dig them immediately.

Can any one tell me how this happens?

In a normal Domain Name registration, doesn't it require some time for the Zones to get updated and cache its entries.

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That DNS entry existed months ago and hasn't changed. The only thing that has changed is that Amazon told you that it's now yours. –  Ladadadada Jan 11 '13 at 10:41
    
is it like before assigning it to instance they update it in DNS and then give to any random Instance. :) Can u tell me how u figured out the DNS entry date? –  Kevin Parker Jan 11 '13 at 10:48
    
I don't know the specific date they created that DNS entry but it would have been immediately after they purchased the netblock the IP address is in. They can reassign the IP address to any instance at any time without changing the DNS entry. –  Ladadadada Jan 11 '13 at 11:13
    
Can u please post this as an answer –  Kevin Parker Jan 11 '13 at 11:15
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

ec2-67-201-11-147.compute-1.amazonaws.com is just an A record that points to 67.201.11.147. There's a one to one relationship. When your instance starts and gets an ip address, that's the hostname it gets.

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That DNS entry existed months ago and hasn't changed. The only thing that has changed is that Amazon told you that it's now yours.

I don't know the specific date they created that DNS entry but it would have been immediately after they purchased the netblock the IP address is in. They can reassign the IP address to any instance at any time without changing the DNS entry.

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