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I have a software RAID setup in Windows Server 2003, which recently had a disk go bad. I replaced the disk, and rebuilt the array. Every time I reboot though, it automatically starts rebuilding the array. The resynching slows disk access down to a crawl, so is there a way to stop or pause it. I have 1 RAID 5, and 2 separate Mirrors, and its trying to resynch all 3 arrays at the same time. This basically makes my bootup time over 48 hours! I'd like to postpone the array rebuilds until after I copy all my precious data off it.

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Pull the disk out. It's going to provide you the same level of redundancy than an array that's rebuilding anyway (ie none)

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I love the simplicity. I'll give it a shot. Still would be nice to know if there is anything I could do from the software side of things. –  Rob Jul 27 '09 at 21:19
    
No Good, thing won't boot with one of the drives out. Any other ideas? –  Rob Jul 27 '09 at 21:30
    
Sorry I didn't give more detail, I was writing it on the train on the way to work, and the iPhone was giving me the shits (this site doesn't work so well on the iPhone, but that's something for the meta site!). Anyway, an array that's being rebuilt has 0 redundancy anyway so you're not loosing anything. Unfortunately I don't know any way of pausing it software-related, as I had a similar issue myself. –  Mark Henderson Jul 27 '09 at 21:31
    
Are you removing the disk that's in the process of being rebuilt (i.e. the one that replaced the failed one)? If the disk failed, that's kinda the point of RAID... –  Mark Henderson Jul 27 '09 at 21:35
    
I have a really strange setup that is contributing to my problems. I have 4 physical disks, 200GB each. I have a 40GB mirror using 40GB of the first 2 drives, I also have another 40GB mirror using 40GB of the other 2 drives. Then, with the extra space on each of the 4 drives, there is a RAID 5 setup. –  Rob Jul 27 '09 at 21:52

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