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I have a disk from a Buffalo LinkStation that has an XFS partition on it that I cannot mount.

Plugging the disk into an SATA->USB caddy on an Ubuntu box. I get the following:

$ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sdb

Disk /dev/sdb: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders, total 976773168 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1              63      594404      297171   83  Linux
/dev/sdb2          594405     1590434      498015   83  Linux
/dev/sdb4         1590435   976768064   487588815    5  Extended
/dev/sdb5         1590498     1863539      136521   82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sdb6         1863603   976494959   487315678+  83  Linux

The problem partition is /dev/sdb6.

$ sudo xfs_check /dev/sdb6
ERROR: The filesystem has valuable metadata changes in a log which needs to
be replayed.  Mount the filesystem to replay the log, and unmount it before
re-running xfs_check.  If you are unable to mount the filesystem, then use
the xfs_repair -L option to destroy the log and attempt a repair.
Note that destroying the log may cause corruption -- please attempt a mount
of the filesystem before doing this.

So trying the xfs_repair -L option gets me to the situation I can't get beyond:

$ sudo xfs_repair -L /dev/sdb6
Phase 1 - find and verify superblock...
superblock read failed, offset 382252089344, size 131072, ag 89, rval -1

fatal error -- Input/output error

Using photorec I have been able to pull some files off that partition, so the data is there and the disk is physically working. However, there is a problem with the superblocks.

How would I recover this partition?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After the XFS replay error, try to MOUNT the partition again, as per the error message.

If all gets too messy, I highly recommend downloading UFS Explorer to help with deep file recovery from another system.

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Thanks for the quick reply. Mounting again after the failed. I just realised I pasted in the wrong command here...I did do the -L option on xfs_repair. However, trying to mount again still doesn't work. –  Kieran Jan 15 '13 at 23:03
    
UFS EXPLORER - ufsexplorer.com –  ewwhite Jan 15 '13 at 23:09
1  
After trying a few free linux tools, nothing beat UFS Explorer. It may be £40, but it worked. Thanks. –  Kieran Jan 18 '13 at 16:50

I have XFS partition on "sda6". On Lubuntu it's corrputed, won't fix and won't mount XFS partition on 13.10. When booting Lubuntu it's says that should be fix and trying on boot to fix XFS filesystem. When I went on first installation Lubuntu, on partition it's says Unknown.

Lubuntu didn't fixed. Using command xfs_check for me didn't solved.

I finally solved back to Debian 7 and reinstall. It's detected all filesystems and normally mounted XFS partition.

I read many users for XFS fileystems, so I think it's problem on changes on kernel versions, because Debian 7 use version 3.2 and mounts XFS normally without errors, but on Ubuntu with latest kernel 3.11 won't solved XFS filesystem.

I tried with CentOS 6.5 but CentOS follow up with RedHat and with old "stable" kernel. It won't detected XFS automatically.

Finally I've on Debian 7 backups all data on XFS partition and recreate partitions to EXT4.


Due to RedHat won't fix XFS reading partition and some problems with XFS (google it how many users didn't solved XFS reading partitions) I've generally opt with Debian to backup and change to new compatible with kernel 3.11 to EXT4/btrfs... filesystems.

Hope this someone helps.

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