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My employer has a network which primarily consists of Windows XP workstations; and I am a Linux user at home.

I have a single Windows 7 workstation which was moved and reconnected to the same switch port in the network closet. At this time, the previously-functioning workstation is listing the wired network connection as an Unidentified public network and not allowing the type of network to be changed.

One possible wrinkle is that the previous IT support staff has set static IP addresses in the 192.9.200.0/24 range (which is not RFC1918 compliant) behind a NAT firewall.

All of the Windows XP clients, Server 2003 servers, and Linux VMs will connect to the Internet without fail. However, this Windows 7 client is refusing to connect, even to the local default gateway.

I ensured the networking information was accurate, including the default gateway and DNS servers, and I have double-checked that the local firewalls are temporarily completely off.

I also noted that when I changed the IP address to a 192.168.1.0/24 address, the network type changed to Work, but that is not a permanent solution at this time.

What am I missing? What logic behind the Windows 7 networking would cause this? Is this primarily due to the IP addressing scheme used in my network?

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1. "One possible wrinkle is that the previous IT support staff has set static IP addresses in the 192.9.200.0/24 range (which is not RFC1918 compliant) behind a NAT firewall" - There's no requirement that RFC1918 addresses be used internally. If the company has been assigned the netblock they're using then they can use it anyway they choose. 2. "I also noted that when I changed the IP address to a 192.168.1.0/24 address, the network type changed to Work, but that is not a permanent solution at this time." - Have you verified the ip range in use on other devices? What's the DG address? –  joeqwerty Jan 17 '13 at 15:03
    
1. Yes, but weren't assigned the 192.9.200.0/24 address space by IANA or our ISP. 2. Yes, I have verified that the address used on this device is in the same IP range as other devices which do work. My default gateway is 192.9.200.62. –  Rob Gibson Jan 17 '13 at 15:45

1 Answer 1

I have solved the problem as of this morning...

My user moved their own computer equipment, including a small router (which I previously installed as a simple switch) to connect both of the user's computers to the single wall jack in the area.

Earlier, I did a cursory check of the cabling, but my user had disconnected both ends of the ethernet cables to relocate this switch. Turns out, the incoming feed from the wall was plugged into the WAN port of the router and the computers plugged into the LAN ports.

I simply moved the cable into a LAN port and Windows 7 immediately identified the network. I was able to switch the profile to Work.

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