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We have an RV082 Linksys/Cisco router with a normal configuration of the WAN port connected to the internet, and the LAN port configured as 192.168.188.1.

This might be a simple question, but I have never tried it before. We are going to connect another router on the LAN at 192.168.188.2. If I add a route into the RV082 like so:

IP: 192.168.166.0
mask: 255.255.255.0
gate: 192.168.188.2
hop: 1
interface: LAN

Will this successfully send packets destined for 192.168.166.0 from our internal LAN over to 192.168.188.2?

The RV082 is in Gateway Mode as opposed to Router Mode, so it is doing NAT.

Has anyone done this, or is it impossible?

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What are you trying to achieve, are you looking to split your network into subnets, or are you simply attempting to add additional switch ports? –  Steve Jan 31 '13 at 14:38
    
The router at 192.168.188.2 goes to a Point to Point connection to another country where we have another office. So we want the two LAN's to communicate with each other. –  charnley Jan 31 '13 at 14:45
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe the RV082 devices have a fairly sane network stack and what you're trying to do should work. I don't have one handy to test, but you can certainly give it a try.

Some of the "real" Cisco firewall devices (the old PIX firewalls, and ASA firewalls prior to OS version 7) were unable to receive a packet and route it back out the same interface.

Ultimately, what you're describing is a perfectly legitimate configuration so I'd go ahead and configure it and test it. I think you're going to find that it works just fine. (Be sure that the far end of your VPN has a route back to your 192.168.166.0/24 network or you're going to have trouble with traffic getting back.)

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Thank you I am going to be setting this up tonight and come back here to confirm. We do indeed have routes on both sides so that both LAN's know how to get to the other side. –  charnley Jan 31 '13 at 17:57
    
I have one Customer who has an RV082 (predating my involvement with them) and it seemed to be a reasonable little SOHO IP router. It would've been nice to have 802.1q VLAN support but, then again, I suppose it's a cheap little box, too. Good luck and let us know how it goes. –  Evan Anderson Jan 31 '13 at 17:59
    
It worked! Thank you for the information. One thing we ran into was the firewall was turned on one of the RV082's that we were using in router mode. We had to turn that off and everything works like a charm. –  charnley Feb 1 '13 at 4:12
    
Great to hear. Sometimes it's a little depressing to think that we work in an industry where being surprised that things work as-expected is the norm. –  Evan Anderson Feb 1 '13 at 5:13
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This sounds to me exactly like what an ICMP redirect is for. The client sends traffic to its default gateway, the default gateway informs the client that there's a better (more specific) route to that destination via another router, the client then updates its routing table with this route, the client then directs all subsequent traffic for that destination to the other router. I don't think you have to do anything more than add the route on the RV082.

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