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So basically at the moment I have a single domain, with an Exchange 2010 server. I am looking to build a new DC as a new Child Domain - but am wondering if there is anything I need to do/run/setup etc on the child or parent DC in order to integrate it successfully into my current DC/Exchange environment.

Cheers!

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Hire a consultant. It doesn't sound like you have enough AD knowledge to pull this off. –  HopelessN00b Feb 8 '13 at 15:36
    
This is merely a test environment - I am looking to learn! –  PnP Feb 8 '13 at 15:37
    
Then you should try it and see what happens (IMO). People tend to learn more from their failures than their successes, and there's no substitute for experience. –  HopelessN00b Feb 8 '13 at 15:43

1 Answer 1

Here is the technet doc with instructions on how to create a new child domain. It's for 2003, but is applicable to later OS versions as well (not that you mentioned what OS the new DC will be).

However, simply creating a new domain is the easy part, it's what you do after the setup that's the tricky part, and without knowing why you're creating a new child domain, it not going to be possible to advise you further, or even determine whether a new child domain is even a good idea to begin with.

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Thanks - my main question is how adding a new child domain integrates with an existing Exchange environment –  PnP Feb 8 '13 at 15:52
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@TheD From the notes: When a child domain is added to an existing tree domain, a two-way, transitive parent and child trust is established by default. It can be a major pain in the ass in larger, more complex environments, but in a small test environment, you shouldn't have any issues or need to do any prep work on the child domain... of course, you'll need to configure your Exchange environment, and get the Exchange schema updates on the child domain, but all that work needed comes after you have the new child domain stood up. –  HopelessN00b Feb 8 '13 at 16:05

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