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From a youtube video I came to know of the following things

  1. All machines connected to a HUB are a part of a single collision domain.
  2. All machines connected to a SWITCH are a part of a single broadcast domain.

It also mentioned that a SWITCH can handle a full duplex cable while a HUB can handle only half duplex cable.

Is a "full-duplex" twisted pair cable physically different from a "half-duplex" twisted pair cable? If yes how is it different?

Also I have read that Ethernet 10/100 is broadcast while Ethernet 1G and 10G is point-to-point. How does these tie in with above ideas?

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2 Answers

Is a "full-duplex" twisted pair cable physically different from a "half-duplex" twisted pair cable? If yes how is it different?

The cables are the same/ Both use 4 wires ( 2 pairs ).

The difference is that in one case one pair is used for data, and the other to signal busy/ready. With full duplex both cables are used for data. One for both sides.

It also mentioned that a SWITCH can handle a full duplex cable while a HUB can handle only half duplex cable.

A store and forward switch establishes a connection between two devices. The switch itself and the other device (e.g. a computer). Since there are only two devices on the cable full duplex is possible.

From a youtube video I came to know of the following things...

Might I suggest a good book. Something about networking and Ethernet 101. You should read that before becoming a professional in this field.

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You hardly would see hubs at these times. They were prevalent when the switching technology was immature and very expensive. As this is not the case any more, Ethernet hubs are gone entirely, so everything you read about them is historic and has no practical relevance.

Half-duplex and full-duplex are just operation modes which are a direct function of the concurrency mode used. Collision detection requires stations to listen while they are sending to check if anyone has tried to send at the same time they did - this is why simultaneous sending and receiving (aka "full duplex") is not supported with CSMA/CD and this is why collisions by definition cannot occur in full duplex operation.

For Ethernet, no separate types of cabling is defined for full duplex operation (some archaic types like 10Base5 or 10Base2 would not support full duplex at all).

Also I have read that Ethernet 10/100 is broadcast

It is not. I think you just confused it with the hub-switch topic considered the Ethernet speeds the hubs and switches used to service.

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