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I stupidly put boot in its own partition of 228M space and now when I try to do an upgrade, it keeps telling me it's out of space.

I tried to remove old packages but still not enough space.

Is there a way to get rid of this /boot partition and just combine it with root?

Or else increase the size of it?

It's a remote server and I have command line access only.

Thanks

Update:

dpkg -l | grep linux-image
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-23-generic       3.2.0-23.36                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-25-generic       3.2.0-25.40                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-26-generic       3.2.0-26.41                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-27-generic       3.2.0-27.43                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-29-generic       3.2.0-29.46                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-31-generic       3.2.0-31.50                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-32-generic       3.2.0-32.51                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-33-generic       3.2.0-33.52                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-34-generic       3.2.0-34.53                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-35-generic       3.2.0-35.55                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
ii  linux-image-3.2.0-38-generic       3.2.0-38.61                             Linux kernel image for version 3.2.0 on 64 bit x86 SMP
iU  linux-image-server                 3.2.0.36.43                             Linux kernel image on Server Equipment.
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Um, what OS distribution and version do you have? –  ewwhite Mar 5 '13 at 6:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you can combine /boot partition into /boot directory under / filesystem backup /boot to other directory

 # rsync -arzgov /boot/ /boot.original/

Unmount /boot partition

 # umount /boot

Copy back the original content into /boot directory

 # rsync -arzgov /boot.original/ /boot/

Commented /boot partition entry on /etc/fstab

 # vi /etc/fstab
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Do not do this unless you are comfortable with modifying the configuration of your (unstated) bootloader, and adjusting it to look for kernel images on the partition you've moved it to. As worded this will prevent all future kernel updates from taking effect. –  Andrew B Mar 5 '13 at 6:40
    
yikes... too late.. i already did it. –  Scott Mar 5 '13 at 6:58
    
Is it easy to revert back? –  Scott Mar 5 '13 at 8:15
    
just uncommented /boot on /etc/fstab, mount /boot. i will revert back. –  chocripple Mar 5 '13 at 8:20
    
okay thanks Rikih! –  Scott Mar 5 '13 at 17:52

If your Linux boot partition is suddenly low on disk space, it probably means you have been accumulating old kernel images. To clear up space, you need only uninstall the old kernels.

First, find out what kernels you have installed:

rpm -qa | grep kernel | sort

Next, find out what version you are running:

tail /proc/version

Lastly, uninstall the kernels you no longer want. You’ll probably want to keep the most current version and perhaps a couple earlier versions:

rpm -e kernel-2.6.9-67.0.4.EL

If you’re not running the most current kernel, you’ll have to restart your machine. Afterward, be sure the most recent kernel is running and uninstall the old version.

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