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I am trying to setup some VM's on Citrix XenServer but can't enable Hardware Virtualization support. In the XenServer install it prompted me to enable this, and upon creating a VM I got a "HVM required" error.

I have a dual core AMD Athlon 64 X2 4400+ processor - does this have support for AMD-V?

How can I enable this to run this software/VM's?

If it helps I am running:

  • a Mach Speed MSNV-939 motherboard with 3 gigs of RAM.
  • Pheonix Technologies 6.0 BIOS

Edit: It looks like the chip can do it, but not with the 939 socket, I need the AM2 socket. Can anyone confirm this?

Thank you,

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

AMD added hardware virtualization with the AM2 socket. Your current chip is made for socket 939 and does not support hardware virtualization.

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Well from what I've read the AM2 and AM2+ socket configurations support the chip I have. Does this mean I have the right chip, just the wrong socket config? –  barfoon Aug 3 '09 at 3:03
    
@barfoon: Run CPU-Z to identify socket type as well as the stepping. cpuid.com/cpuz.php –  SZayat Aug 3 '09 at 3:17
    
The x2 4400+ was made for both socket 939 and AM2. The AM2 version supports virtualization, but the 939 version (which I believe you have due to the 939 in your motherboard model) does not support it. –  Thomas Georgiou Aug 3 '09 at 3:28
    
+1 upvote as your comments contain correct information. You should update your response to include that. I think this is the reason for the downvote as you dont provide insight into your conclusion –  Wayne Aug 3 '09 at 4:16

Yes, it have. You should look at svm flag in your /proc/cpuinfo.

Here is the output from my system that uses this processor (two lines are for two cores):

$ grep svm /proc/cpuinfo 
flags   	: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ht syscall nx mmxext fxsr_opt rdtscp lm 3dnowext 3dnow rep_good nopl pni cx16 lahf_lm cmp_legacy svm extapic cr8_legacy 3dnowprefetch
flags   	: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ht syscall nx mmxext fxsr_opt rdtscp lm 3dnowext 3dnow rep_good nopl pni cx16 lahf_lm cmp_legacy svm extapic cr8_legacy 3dnowprefetch
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You can use SecurAble to determine if your processor has Hardware Virtualization support.

alt text

If you can't use SecurAble then try looking in the BIOS as it can be disabled by default.

This article says that your Athlon 64 X2 4400+ has HV.

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I cant use SecurAble ATM - windows isnt installed on the machine... –  barfoon Aug 3 '09 at 3:06
3  
cat /proc/cpuinfo on Linux. Look for vmx flag. –  Antoine Benkemoun Aug 3 '09 at 9:50
    
nothing* is installed on the machine right now... –  barfoon Aug 4 '09 at 13:06

According to wiki "AMD-V capability is also available on Athlon 64 and Athlon 64 X2 family of processors with "F" or "G" stepping on socket AM2" so not all AM2 CPUs support AMD-V.

You can make sure with of CPU stepping via AMDCompare.com website.

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Yeah, I read the wiki - what does "F" or "G" mean?? –  barfoon Aug 3 '09 at 3:22
    
CPU stepping is the "revision number" for that model of CPU. Revision level represents when it was manufactured. The more recent the CPU stepping, the more features or more energy-efficient it is even though the speed is the same. –  SZayat Aug 3 '09 at 3:38

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