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I'm curious as to whether it would be possible to create an email address without the name information. So, @example.com rather than name@example.com.

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No. However, you can often create a catch-all address, depending on the mail server software you use, so that something sent to anything@example.com gets to you. –  David W Apr 29 '13 at 2:48
    
But sending something to @example.com would not fall under that subset of anything? –  Wolfram Apr 29 '13 at 2:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'll post this as an answer, following up from my comment:

No. However, you can often create a catch-all address, depending on the mail server software you use, so that something sent to anything@example.com gets to you

As specified in RFC 2822, a valid email address must have a "locally interpreted string followed by the at-sign character".

As neo pointed out, a space would work, because technically that COULD be interpreted as a valid string by some programs.

But simply @example.com isn't valid, and would never work.

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Obsoleted (again) by RFC 5322. –  Michael Hampton Apr 29 '13 at 3:29
    
Alright, thanks for the answer. The ability to use a space is interesting, but in that case I could just as well use a less confusing character. –  Wolfram Apr 29 '13 at 3:59
    
I almost linked to 822, but saw it was obsoleted by 2822. Thanks for pointing that out, Michael. Mental note made. –  David W Apr 29 '13 at 13:38

No, you cannot. A valid email address should have local part and domain part, e.g., local@domain. However, you can use " "@example.org (space between the quotes), but it may not be valid to some server and client. See wikipedia for further information.

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