Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just ghosted an Ubuntu (12.04) instance from a 200GB HD to a 1TB HD. The ghosted instance has two mounted storage partitions both of about 100GB each and I have the following partition table:

Partition      File System      Mount Point
/dev/sda1      ext4             /
/dev/sda2      extended         
  /dev/sda5    linux-swap       
/dev/sda3      ext4             /development
/dev/sda4      ext4             

/dev/sda4 is a copy of /dev/sda1, just on a larger partition. I now want the /dev/sda4 partition to be mounted at root (/) so that it is the default boot partition.

Finally a question - how can I change the /dev/sda4 partition to be mounted at root?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

/etc/fstab should be modified with the entries for the new partition. It has parameters to define mountpoint and whether to be mounted automatically.

If you're looking for detailed explanations, look here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AutomaticallyMountPartitions http://askubuntu.com/questions/164926/how-to-make-hdds-mount-at-startup-in-ubuntu-12-04

share|improve this answer
    
Very useful answer @Droidzone thanks :) –  travega May 6 '13 at 1:47
add comment

You have to change the boot loader configuration. That is probably Grub or Grub2. There is a kernel parameter root=... with the device name, device ID, file system label or file system UUID. You have to change that to the new partition. On /dev/sda4 you have to change the entry in /etc/fstab.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate? –  travega May 5 '13 at 23:51
2  
@travega I don't know Ubuntu 12.04. Somebody who knows could tell you in detail which distro tool to use. But if you want good answers you should get used to asking much better (=more precise) questions than "Can you elaborate?". This is a site for professionals and noone is going to read the manual to you. So tell what you have tried and what the problem is. /etc/fstab can be changed with every editor (but probably there is a distro tool for that). –  Hauke Laging May 6 '13 at 0:04
1  
I am full aware that this is a resource for professionals and as such expect answers to be of high quality not vague hints at what I need to look at. My OP couldn't be more concise. If your statement: "I don't know Ubuntu 12.04" is true then I would suggest perhaps you are not best qualified to answer the question. –  travega May 6 '13 at 0:10
1  
@travega You expect from (unpaid) others but not from yourself. We love that kind here. Good luck with waiting for people who follow your attitude. Your statement does not even excuse your comment (which I referred to, not the OP). My hints were no vague guesses but a precise answer what to do. Just not how to do that. People who don't know how to edit fstab are not helped here but laughed at. Remember: Professionals. And if you want just the best qualified people to answer then mention that in your question to make sure those are not interested in helping you. –  Hauke Laging May 6 '13 at 0:24
2  
Please, let's keep it civil here guys - these posts are starting to gather mod flags. @travega - if you need clarification about a specific point, you're welcome to ask another question that focusses on the part you're having trouble with (e.g. if you can't find the fstab file or are having trouble editing it, then ask a specific question about that). @Hauke - no need to be snarky or to have a go at someone simply for asking for clarification. –  Mark Henderson May 6 '13 at 1:30
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.