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I was trying to do a backup for my SVN repository in AIX through following command:

svnadmin dump <path> > dump_file

and also this command:

svnrdump dump <path> > dump_file

but failed with this error: E000027: Can't write to stream: A file cannot be larger than the value set by ulimit.

When I do the svnrdump in Windows, the process was completed successfully. But when I move the file from Windows to AIX, it failed the process.

In this incident, I found a similarity, both cases have same file size, which is 1,073,741,312. I am just thinking this shouldn't be the problem of SVN since the dump process was completed successfully in Windows. This might be the problem from server, it might be the cause where a limit cache size was set during the copy process or any other causes but I don't know how and where I should look for it. Could you please give me some guideline on how should I resolve this error?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The issue is not in SVN, but in your AIX machine's configuration. Particularly, the user you are running this command line as is unable to create files larger than a certain size, a limit which would have been set using ulimit. Unless you are root, you will have to have someone who has root remove this constraint for you.

Ulimits apply to a process and all its child processes (eg. your login process, shell, and commands you run). If it happens that your shell init (like .bashrc) has a line in it like ulimit -f 123456789, you may just be able to remove that or change the maximum.

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Thank you so much on the hints, when I issue the command ulimit -a, I see that file(blocks) is 2097151. Given default block size is 512, 2097151 * 512 is equivalent to 1073741312, which is exactly the same size as shown in the file. –  huahsin68 May 22 '13 at 13:15

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