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I have a question. When using a computer at work one saves personal data as well. For example gmail accounts in the browser. Other credentials again in the browser or elsewhere. Also files from places like dropbox etc. There are plenty of legitimate reasons why these data may end up on a work computer.

The problem is that admins can reset your active directory password and then log into your pc and have full access to your accounts and logs. Even Skype accounts etc.

The obvious solution would be not to save anything in the browsers and not install dropbox (or create a work account for it) and log out from skype (which we use at work). But this is a lot of work. So is there any way to secure one's data against such a scenario?

To avoid comments like the one below:

I know whose property the computer is. However when the company asks you to use Skype and you do not want to create two accounts one for you and one for when you are at work or you don't want to create another dropbox account what do you do.

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closed as too localized by Ryan Ries, joeqwerty, ceejayoz, Chris S May 28 '13 at 14:37

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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A work computer is your company's property, not yours. If you don't want them to access your data, don't put it on your work computer. –  cole May 28 '13 at 14:25
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Don't conduct personal business on your work computer at work. –  joeqwerty May 28 '13 at 14:30
    
Re: your edit: you suck it up. Either be less paranoid (are your workplace admins really that interested in your Skype account) or deal with the inconvenience of different accounts. –  ceejayoz May 28 '13 at 14:35
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I closed this as too localized because your Local Laws will vary. Your IP indicates that you're not from the US, and most answers here are going to involve US laws (where anything on a computer becomes the property of the owner, the employer in most cases). Without involving a Lawyer there's no good way to answer this question for your case. –  Chris S May 28 '13 at 14:39
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Chris S's answer is really important because as others have expressed the computer is the companies. Personal data may or may not belong to the company as well (even in the US there is no uniform law on privacy) and it's not even clear if admins can legally perform the actions described above. –  Jim B May 28 '13 at 16:32

2 Answers 2

Easy way: treat it like a public machine and set any site you visit to NOT save your credentials. You can do this with most websites (including Gmail). For Skype, disable auto-login on startup. Dropbox - just don't use it on your work computer.

In the end, it comes down to trust. If you can't trust your IT admins that they are professional and will not snoop in your personal data, then you have other things to worry about.

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I know whose property the computer is. However when the company asks you to use Skype and you do not want to create two accounts one for you and one for when you are at work or you don't want to create another dropbox account what do you do.

You have two choices:

  1. Use your own accounts and open up the possibility of access to your employer
  2. Create new accounts
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