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I have an old RHEL 5.5 Box,

When I fire df -kh I see that /var is of 49 GB with 100 % usage.

But then I go inside the /var

cd /var

and I fire

du -kh

I see that only total 300 MBs are used.

I am not able to get it. Is is possible that this partition is shared with different partition?

I see that /opt is also of 49 GB. I think that they are same partition.

I need to free /var to start mysql but there is hardly anything to be deleted.

Any pointers?

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marked as duplicate by Falcon Momot, Dennis Kaarsemaker, Stephane, Ward, mdpc Jun 25 '13 at 16:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
What does mount say? Is /var a symlink to somewhere inside /opt? –  Patrice Levesque Jun 25 '13 at 7:14
1  
Please add the output of sudo lsof +L1 in your question. –  ThatGraemeGuy Jun 25 '13 at 8:01
    
If you look over on the right of the page under Related - one of the Q&As there will almost certainly answer your question. My guess is that you have deleted a log file but forgotten to restart the daemon that is writing to it so the file is still occupying disk space. –  Iain Jun 25 '13 at 8:19
    
Hello, welcome to serverfault, this question has already been here : serverfault.com/questions/57098/du-vs-df-difference –  coincoin Jun 25 '13 at 8:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Its possible that youve deleted a lot of files, they arent on disk, but the process still has them open. Restart the process that you think has them open. Sometimes merely a kill -HUP will do it.

To find the processes that have files in this filesystem open, use fuser -c <filesustem> or lsof +L1 | grep <filesystem>

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