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I would like to install a low-traffic application server to be shared by 3/4 persons in a cubicle.

To simplify deployment and maintenance I would like to use VMware vSphere Hypervisor. Is one physical NIC on the vSphere host sufficient for this scenario? If so, what kind/type of network configuration is suitable on the vSphere host to separate traffic addressed to the guest OS from host management traffic?

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why use vsphere in this case you'd gain nothing and pay a lot for that nothing? –  tony roth Sep 13 '13 at 14:29
    
@tony I would he would be referring to the free version of vSphere which costs nothing for licensing and he does gain some limited benefits of a standalone host. –  Rex Sep 13 '13 at 14:43
    
I meant VMware vSphere Hypervisor, which is free. The main reason for using vSphere is the possibility to develop new versions of the application server on a separate box, using VMware Workstation, and easily deploy them for production. –  antonio Sep 13 '13 at 14:43

1 Answer 1

Q: Is one physical NIC on the vSphere host sufficient for this scenario?

A: More than likely. Technically it will work. I'm assuming that the NIC and switch are 1Gbps and if so, that should provide enough bandwidth for your VM's.

Q: What kind/type of network configuration is suitable on the vSphere host to separate traffic addressed to the guest OS from host management traffic?

A: If you have only 1 physical NIC then you can't separate management traffic from VM traffic, but there really isn't going to be any management traffic, at least none that will impact the performance of the VM traffic. The only management traffic you're going to have is when you connect to the host with the vSphere client to perform some task on the host, such as when creating or modifying a VM.

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I completely agree, just saying: using Virtual Switch, you can define VLAN's but it would be useful only for segregating traffic between guests. –  Mehdi Sep 13 '13 at 14:32
    
+1 yes I mean just that. Not a matter of performances, just the traffic when from time to time I have to connect to the VM remotely to modify some settings etc. On the client side how can I address requests to host or guest OS? Probably it could be a given port number to be added to the vSphere IP address when I want to talk with the management interface. –  antonio Sep 13 '13 at 14:54
    
It appears that you don't have a lot of experience with vSphere. That's OK, we all start from the same place. When you install vSphere you'll assign an ip address to the management network. That's how you'll connect to the host. You'll assign ip addresses to the guests just as you would if they were physical machines. Have a watch of this video - youtube.com/watch?v=ZBl1Tf2A4lA –  joeqwerty Sep 13 '13 at 15:09
    
If you only have one IP address available for the esxi box.. things might get messy. –  lVlint67 Sep 13 '13 at 15:31

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