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This is a question that I have been asking myself for a while. Unfortunately I have not been able to find any results on Google, or any other search engine for that matter.

My research into this question lead me to these following answers:

  • DNS and how that works to link an IP to a domain
  • Reseller services provided by hosting companies to sell domains

Whilst these answers go some way to answering my question, I am still unclear on how one registers a domain name without going through a pre-existing domain registrar.

Moreover, I would like to know how companies, that sell domains, actually register them for the buyer of said domain. I suppose that is the bottom-line of my question.

How does one go about registering a domain to their server, without going through a domain registration company?

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You don't "register domains to their servers" - domains are registered to identities (eg. you or your company) who in turn transfer domain authority to name servers of their choice. And no, they don't do it without a registrar –  Mathias R. Jessen Sep 20 '13 at 12:44

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"Moreover, I would like to know how companies, that sell domains, actually register them for the buyer of said domain. I suppose that is the bottom-line of my question"

A: The registrar verifies that the domain name is available by checking with the registry that manages the corresponding TLD. If it is available, the registrar registers the domain name with the registry, which adds it to the registry database. An example of a "registry" is Verisign. Since Verisign is the authoritative directory provider for .com, .net, .name, .tv, and .cc instance, if you register a .com domain then the domain registrar will check with Verisign's database (I believe they still use EPP to do this) to make sure it isn't a dupe/in-use, then they register it in Verisign's .com database on your behalf.

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Thanks you, this was very informative for me. –  Enijar Sep 20 '13 at 13:06

You first need the zone delegated to you. That is what a registrar does. You must go through a registrar for this unless you happen to be one of the few people on the planet with direct access to the relevant DNS root server.

Once you have the zone delegated to you, your registrar will have created SOA and NS records for you based on the data provided during registration. If you chose to self-host, then this will point at your DNS servers. If you have chosen to have a third party host your DNS, it will point to their servers. Once you have the zone delegated to these servers, you can control what is in it using various resource records, but you cannot skip the first step that involves the registrar.

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After, the helpful comments above and some further research, I have come to understand that ICANN is the bottom line for domain creation and thus registration. To anyone else who had the same question as me and wants to know how to create domains without going through domain registration sites, follow this link icann.org/en/resources/registrars/accreditation –  Enijar Sep 20 '13 at 13:03
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@Enijar - I don't really see that as valid. What you would be doing is becoming a Registrar, not bypassing the domain registration process. Anyone who would become a Registrar for the purpose of registering a domain without using one of the existing Registrars would be a fool. –  joeqwerty Sep 20 '13 at 13:26
    
@joeqwerty My question was exactly "I would like to know how companies, that sell domains, actually register them for the buyer". Now knowing that ICANN is the Authority on domain entries to the DNS database is what I was after. –  Enijar Sep 20 '13 at 15:00
    
Actually, your question, verbatim, was How does one go about registering a domain to their server, without going through a domain registration company? and the answer is that you don't. Becoming a registrar isn't circumventing the registrar process... –  MDMarra Sep 20 '13 at 17:18

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