Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok, I know there are many topics on this but I just need clear cut answer.

enter image description here

Simply, how do I extend C:\ up to end of unallocated space WITHOUT DATA LOSS?

I've done my research and MS KB says you cannot since dynamic volume is on system volume.
There is lots of other posts says you can using different methods but it's not clear to me nor has more than 5 points. So I'm a bit unsure, and I would think this would be a very popular question. Any help would be greatly appreciated.


UPDATE : More info in addtion to pauska's anwwer and other's comments

Resizing a Dynamic System Partition on Windows 2003 - for Free : seems to be worth a try

I ended up spending some money on tool to turn dynamic into basic disk since it was important enough (mostly b/c too lazy to follow WinPE =)).
Backuped first -> Dynamic to Basic -> GParted to extend the basic disk -> finally from Windows changed it back to dynamic.

share|improve this question
    
Saying you've done research and showing you've done research are different things. Regardless, as Pauska references there's no native way to do this, and the only supported MS way of doing it to the boot the Server with WinPE and modify the disk with diskpart. Note that though this is "Supported" they do not guarantee against dataloss under any circumstances. So backups should be your first task (Also, backups should never be considered valid until you've actually restored something; the "validation" tickmark on the backup job doesn't protect against "oops, forgot important files"). –  Chris S Oct 3 '13 at 17:22
    
VM or physical machine? If it's a VM, you can shut the server down, mount the volume on another VM and use diskpart from there. –  Simon Catlin Oct 4 '13 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here's your clear cut answer: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/325590

I hope it was clear cut enough for you. You know, since we all sit here and get paid for giving impatient, demanding people clear cut answers.

Edit: Sorry for the rant, we get a lot of fly-by posters who do no research and demand a quick and correct answer. Please show us that you've done some research next time :-)

From my comment below: There is no native built-in functionaility in Windows Server 2003 to extend a system volume. You have two choices - either boot a PE image on the server and run diskpart from it, and try to extend the volume. Option two is to either buy a 3rd-party partiton tool, or use a free one like Qparted. The bottom line is that there is no guarantee of data consistency with non-native tools. You have to run a backup in case this goes down the drain.

share|improve this answer
    
That article says clearly, you cant since its on it's system volume is dynamic. Are you saying you cant? I've read, it has to convert to basic then extend, then turn to dynamic. Can you or not extend system dynamic volume? –  Philip Rhee Oct 3 '13 at 16:48
    
Fine. Like you've concluded, there is no native built-in functionaility in Windows Server 2003 to extend a system volume. You have two choices - either boot a PE image on the server and run diskpart from it, and try to extend the volume. Option two is to either buy a 3rd-party partiton tool, or use a free one like Qparted. The bottom line is that there is no guarantee of data consistency with non-native tools. You have to run a backup in case this goes down the drain. –  pauska Oct 3 '13 at 16:57
    
Are you trying to help or trying to nip pick at my question? I've done my research and of course, your link came up which says no. On the other hand, there are plenty of posts that says you can using different methods. None of them being that clear to me nor has more than 5 points. –  Philip Rhee Oct 3 '13 at 17:00
1  
@PhilipRhee There's no guarantee your data won't be lost on an extend. Win2k3 does not have a tool to extend dynamic partitions so you have to use a 3rd party one. Even if Windows had a tool, there's always a chance of data loss. –  Nathan C Oct 3 '13 at 17:10
1  
@PhilipRhee It's not at all clear that you researched anything prior to asking, since you never noted it in your original question. That's why you are receiving such a negative response: it appears (and still does) that you didn't do your homework. –  Michael Hampton Oct 3 '13 at 17:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.