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I just want to know what are all the public IPv6 ranges which ISPs or other users can use? Also need a list of addresses which can be used in private networks and also the list of addresses which never can be used in any network. I have been searching through different web sites. But none gives a reliable answer.

Actually we are developing an application which allows user to plan their IP address(create supernets, subnets, hosts, assign host to ports etc). So my application should be able to distinguish between all kinds of address ranges, whether it is reserved, public, private, multicast etc

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Out of curiosity (and to potentially improve my answer): what is your use-case for private IPv6 addresses? –  Sander Steffann Oct 17 '13 at 7:41
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marked as duplicate by TomTom, mdpc, Ward, voretaq7 Oct 28 '13 at 16:37

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want private IPv6 addresses then you should use Unique Local Addresses (ULA). ULA addresses are not routed on the internet and their advantage is that everybody can generate their own /48 block of which 40 bits are randomly generated so that your private addresses are very unlikely to overlap with somebody else's private addresses.

The ULA addresses are in fc00::/7. fc00::/8 is reserved for ULA addresses coming from central registries, but as such registries don't exist (yet) they are not to be used. The fd00::/8 prefix is for generating your own /48 from, so feel free to use that.

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Thank you. Actually we are developing an application which allows user to plan their IP address(create supernets, subnets, hosts, assign host to ports etc). So my application should be able to distinguish between all kinds of address ranges, whether it is reserved, public, private, multicast etc. –  vipin raj Oct 17 '13 at 10:04
    
Vipin, if this answer has answered your question, local etiquette is that you accept it by clicking on the tick outline next to it, thus driving the SF reputation system. My apologies if you already know this. –  MadHatter Oct 17 '13 at 15:47
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See What is the IPv6 equivalent to IPv4 RFC1918 addresses? for more information. (rfc1918 refers to ipv4 private ip addresses like 192.x.x.x)

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Welcome to ServerFault! Instead of linking to another question in ServerFault, you may flag a question as a duplicate (after you get that privilege, of course). –  Pothi Oct 25 '13 at 9:09
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as i know IPv6 is not having privat or public addres itself. more or less your router/Firewall will permit to go out or be reached from outside. If you know your ipv6 adresse you could be pinged from outside

have a nice day vinc

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Well, now we all know that you dont really know a lot aobut Ipv6 ;) –  TomTom Oct 25 '13 at 6:23
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