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On Linux you can just edit the smb.conf file and add a veto files setting to ignore and delete certain files, this came in really handy as both OS X and Windows love to create extra files. However, how can I do this on a Windows Server machine? I would like to have files just simply be ignored from the shares, and deleted if possible. I am using Windows Server 2012 R2.

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On a windows samba share? Don't you mean on a windows file share? Samba is kind of a linux thing. –  Falcon Momot Nov 2 '13 at 8:53
    
Yes - I mean Windows File Share. –  ecnepsnai Nov 2 '13 at 9:02
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Windows has the File Server Resource Monitor utilities. File Screen allows you configure filtering of specific file extensions from shares. But this differs from veto files as a File Screen can actively prevent the files from being created. –  jscott Nov 2 '13 at 9:49
    
That's exactly what I'm looking for! Thank you! Feel free to write an answer and I'll mark it solved. –  ecnepsnai Nov 2 '13 at 22:30
    
Just for information: The protocol is named SMB (Server Message Block). Sambda is an open implementation of SMB. I am not sure whats the actual name of the Microsoft implementation, but if you talk about that, you may safely refer to SMB share. If you talk about linux file shares, you may refer to Samba share. –  Daniel Jun 16 at 16:34

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Just copying jscott's comment into an answer to allow closure :

Windows has the File Server Resource Monitor utilities. File Screen allows you configure filtering of specific file extensions from shares. But this differs from veto files as a File Screen can actively prevent the files from being created.

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