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root@secure [~]# find / -name python3.4 | rm -rf   

root@secure [~]# locate python3.4 
/root/.local/lib/python3.4 
/usr/local/include/python3.4m 
/usr/local/lib/libpython3.4m.a 
/usr/local/lib/python3.4 
/usr/local/share/man/man1/python3.4.1 

still there!!!

root@secure [~]# locate python3.4 | rm -rf 

root@secure [~]# locate python3.4 

/root/.local/lib/python3.4 
/usr/local/include/python3.4m 
/usr/local/lib/libpython3.4m.a 
/usr/local/lib/python3.4 
/usr/local/share/man/man1/python3.4.1 
root@secure [~]# 

still there!!!

==================================

The Questions Are:

  1. DELETE ALL REMAINS OF PYTHON 3.4a

  2. HOW AM'I I GOING TO DELETE THESE 2 PACKAGES THAT PIP INSTALLED (pymysql, pygeoip)

  3. HOW CAN I PROPERLY INSTALL THE ABOVE 2 WRONGLY PLACED MODULES (pymysql, pygeoip) SO THEY CAN BE USED BY PYTHON 3.3.2 AND NOT BY PYTHON 2.6.6

===================================

CentOS 6.4

wget http://python.org
./configure
make
make install 

and i have finally removed it as:

find / -name python3.4 -exec rm -rf {} \;

===============

I will kindly ask you please to show me a way to:

pip install pymysql
pip install pygeoip

So i will not receive this error at http://superhost.gr Those modules are installed into m system but for some reason i suspect they work under 2.6.6 and not under 3.3.2


python3.4 is gone at this stage. Now if i only could install pip for Python 3.3.2 Here is what i have tried:

root@secure [~]# which python3
/usr/bin/python3
root@secure [~]# which pip
/usr/bin/pip
root@secure [~]# yum install pip3
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
 * base: centos.secrel.com.br
 * epel: mirror.imt-systems.com
 * extras: centos.secrel.com.br
 * remi: mirror5.layerjet.com
 * updates: mirrors.ucr.ac.cr
Setting up Install Process
No package pip3 available.
Error: Nothing to do

Where to find 'pip3' for Python 3.3.2?

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closed as off-topic by Ward, Dave M, MadHatter, mdpc, Falcon Momot Nov 19 '13 at 2:59

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

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What OS are you using? How was python3.4 installed and finally how was the old python removed? And you can't use rm like that, because it does not expect files to remove from STDIN. –  Petter H Nov 16 '13 at 16:14
    
See my edit 1st post please because i tried o write ti here and it had no '/r/n', it seemed more like a big 1-line. Enter doesn't work in comments? –  Nikos Nov 16 '13 at 17:21
    
Why is this find / -name python3.4 -exec rm -rf {} \; different from: find / -name python3.4 | rm -rf Doesn't any command take its input via STDIN or from a text file or from another's command output? If the above was true then wouldn't linux displayed an error when i issued: find / -name python3.4 | rm -rf locate python3.4 | rm -rf The fact that it hasn't and it has indeed deleted many files proved that rm as an other linux command can take input from another's command output. –  Nikos Nov 16 '13 at 17:23
    
Many commands don't read from STDIN. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 18 '13 at 16:56
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1 Answer

Of course it's still there, locate uses a database to look up the location. Until you update the database using updatedb it's going to continue reporting the same locations. It should be run automatically probably in cron.daily.

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