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I wanted to connect to my Linux OS (specifically for Terminal prompt), through my Windows OS.

I have Linux configured through a virtual machine, as well as through a separate partition.

How can I connect to Linux OS from windows command prompt? How is it possible?

I have seen at a place somewhere, they had Unix/Linux Server at some place, and they connect their Windows PC to the Linux server (e.g. telnet 123.23.34.5), it asks for user credentials and then they recieve the $ prompt, where they can use vi editor and execute all unix commands. What is the process behind this type of configuration?

Please share your thoughts.

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Unless you really need telnet for some unusual reason, don't use telnet for this.

SSH can provide the same environment, but provides encryption and plenty of other useful features. Telnet on the other hand provides no security at all, passwords are sent in plain text. Certainly, I wouldn't even consider allowing telnet outside of a home lan or other secure network.

Various windows ssh clients are avaliable, putty being one of the more popular ones. It doesn't require any installation or admin privileges to use.

All linux distros will come with an ssh server, although some (like ubuntu) won't install it by default. Installing the ssh server packaged by your distro will generally do all the setup for you, there's no manual configuration required unless you want to change the default settings (usually, to add stuff like security restrictions). There's already a few questions on SF about how to secure your ssh server.

Telnet servers should also be available packaged for your distro, but, please strongly consider the alternatives before choosing that option.

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Thanks a lot.. You Answer was worth considering.. I installed both the things.. and its working fine.. Thanks again.. –  RBA Aug 23 '09 at 4:33
4  
And if you really do need telnet, fix whatever it is that requires telnet so that it doesn't any more. Telnet needs to die. –  womble Aug 23 '09 at 6:53

Well, you don't really want to use telnet anymore, because it's really sniffable. Aside from that, ssh (secure shell) has much more nice features, like login in with a key.

What you "should" do is install sshd on the linux server (but it might already be there) and use PuTTY (or some other SSH client) to connect to the linux server.

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Thanks a lot.. –  RBA Aug 23 '09 at 4:32

As stated in other answers use an ssh client. You might need the output from the following command on the Linux box: ifconfig | grep addr to find the IP address to get to your server. I am not sure how to use the inet6 stuff yet but the inet addr line will have the ip to configure putty. Putty is free and it is a good client. If you are using putty commercially then make sure to read the license carefully. For learning purposes, on your own local box, plain old telnet might be the quicker option. The vi editor is a little frustrating with terminal types but normally vt100 nearly always works.

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