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It does not seem possible to show more precises logical and physical drives sizes using hpacucli.

For example, below I can only see sizes in TB and I cannot figure out how to display them in MB.

hpacucli ctrl slot=1 pd 2I:1:1 show

Smart Array P222 in Slot 1

   unassigned

      physicaldrive 2I:1:1
         Port: 2I
         Box: 1
         Bay: 1
         Status: OK
         Drive Type: Unassigned Drive
         Interface Type: SATA
         Size: 2 TB
         Rotational Speed: 7200
         Firmware Revision: HPG1    
         Serial Number: BLAH        
         Model: ATA     MB2000GCVBR     
         SATA NCQ Capable: True
         SATA NCQ Enabled: True
         Current Temperature (C): 31
         Maximum Temperature (C): 43
         PHY Count: 1
         PHY Transfer Rate: 6.0Gbps
         Drive Authentication Status: OK
   Carrier Application Version: 11
   Carrier Bootloader Version: 6

How can I get more accurate sizes of my physical and logical drives?

Thanks for your help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No, this is not possible.

In your configurations, you would specify logical drive sizes in Megabytes. As for Physical Drive sizes, how much detail do you need? A 2TB disk is a 2TB disk. A 600GB disk is a 600GB disk, etc. Typical display:

physicaldrive 2I:1:6 (port 2I:box 1:bay 6, SAS, 600.1 GB, OK)

physicaldrive 2I:1:5 (port 2I:box 1:bay 5, SAS, 300 GB, OK)

physicaldrive 1I:1:4 (port 1I:box 1:bay 4, SAS, 146 GB, OK)

Do you need something more granular?

A more complex arrangement would look like, but the configuration parameters for the logical drives are input in Megabyte units:

=> ctrl all show config        

Smart Array P410i in Slot 0 (Embedded)    (sn: 5001438017F5AF20)

   array A (SAS, Unused Space: 186572  MB)


      logicaldrive 1 (72.0 GB, RAID 1+0, OK)
      logicaldrive 2 (475.0 GB, RAID 1+0, OK)
      logicaldrive 3 (200.0 GB, RAID 1+0, OK)

      physicaldrive 1I:1:1 (port 1I:box 1:bay 1, SAS, 300 GB, OK)
      physicaldrive 1I:1:2 (port 1I:box 1:bay 2, SAS, 300 GB, OK)
      physicaldrive 1I:1:3 (port 1I:box 1:bay 3, SAS, 300 GB, OK)
      physicaldrive 2I:1:5 (port 2I:box 1:bay 5, SAS, 300 GB, OK)
      physicaldrive 2I:1:6 (port 2I:box 1:bay 6, SAS, 300 GB, OK)
      physicaldrive 2I:1:7 (port 2I:box 1:bay 7, SAS, 300 GB, OK)

Edit:

Compare:

  physicaldrive 0:0 (box 0:bay 0, SAS, 1 TB, OK)
  physicaldrive 0:0 (box 0:bay 0, SAS, 1 TB, OK)
  physicaldrive 0:0 (box 0:bay 0, SAS, 1 TB, OK)
  physicaldrive 0:0 (box 0:bay 0, SAS, 1 TB, OK)

to

enter image description here

to

enter image description here

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Thanks for your answer. I've already seen I can create a new logical drive with sizes in MB however I can't display precise created logical drive sizes. –  Tuxkowo Feb 27 at 15:37
    
@tuxkowo can you provide more context about what you're doing and why it's important to show disk sizes in more granular units? –  ewwhite Feb 27 at 16:23
    
What is imprecise about 200.0GB? Is it a GB vs. GiB concern? –  MikeyB Feb 27 at 16:32
    
@ewwhite: I need it to store sizes in DB to provide a tool for creating an UI to manage LD. I already have sizes stored there and I can't figure out where they come from (I haven't done that part) –  Tuxkowo Feb 27 at 16:39
1  
@ewwhite: It seems to be also available in XML file produced by "hpacucli ctrl slot=%i diag" command. –  Tuxkowo Feb 28 at 12:22

You can use units to convert for you:

$ PARSED_SIZE="2 TB"
$ units --compact --one-line "$PARSED_SIZE" MB
2000000
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