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We're an sccm shop, and use it to deploy Windows. When deploying Dell laptops (multiple models), the touchpad drivers seem install properly, but the software doesn't. The resulting problem is that when the touchpad is pressed on occasion, the mouse pointer will 'jump' to certain points on the screen.

A possible symptom of this problem/visible sign is if the touchpad icon isn't in the system tray. The software is in the control panel, but when opened part of the gui is pixelated, indicating botched install maybe?

The manual resolution to this, is to go into device manager and uninstall the driver with the option to uninstall all driver software. After a restart, the driver and software is apparently reinstalled, and from there works as expected.

Obviously this partially defeats the purpose of a zero touch deployment. If anyone knows why this is and/or a possible workaround, those answers would be valid as well. Barring that, I want to find a way to deploy the driver and touchpad software in an unattended way, so that it can be conditionally installing during the imaging process. To be honest I'm not sure how to troubleshoot this, I suppose I could try drvinst.exe to install the driver, but finding out why this fails initially would keep me from spinning my wheels.

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2 Answers 2

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I got around this by inadvertently by Creating my base image on a dell laptop. Even after sysprepping, the touchpad application is functional on all dell laptops the image is deployed on, once the dell drivers are added during the task sequence.

A quirk to this is that desktops also have the touchpad app in control panel, but at least it doesn't show up in the system tray.

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I created a "Post Build" Drivers section for my TS. Those drivers which I have found fail the TS I pop into this section and use dpinst to install (64 or 32 bit).

This is used for various HP, Dell and Lenovo bits n bobs which as I said fail when deployed with the drivers install task.

Having a post build drivers section also makes good sense in the long term. I have found most touchpad drivers fail anyway and when deployed post build it works a treat.

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