Take the 2-minute tour ×
Server Fault is a question and answer site for professional system and network administrators. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to check the availability of Internet connectivity by sending ICMP "echo request" messages to some IPv4 addresses. Those IPv4 addresses should be as reachable as possible in stability wise and they should not handle ICMP traffic as low priority. I know that DNS servers of tier-1 ISP's(e.g. Level3) and large content providers(for example Google 8.8.8.8) are a popular choice. Maybe it's wiser to use some service which is using DNS entries(IP addresses in different ISP networks) in round-robin fashion like pool.ntp.org? In a nutshell, which IP addresses do you use for this and why?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

An upstream router at your ISP might be a good choice too. Typically something one hop up from your local router.

Though a word of caution, the problem with doing this or using Google or L3 would be that it is possible the responders not to work, but the connection still be up and online. Just make sure you use them as a test and not rely on only one as an automated way to failover a connection... One of those, been there, done that situations...

share|improve this answer
    
best practice for automated failover is probably to use ISP upstream router AND tier-1 ISP DNS server AND Google DNS server? In other words, failover connection to another provider only if all three are not reachable at the same time? –  Martin Mar 10 at 11:37
    
IMO, that would be a good idea. Perhaps do it in 'stages', e.g., ping every 5 seconds, if fail do 4 pings once every second, then if all 4 pings fail, raise the alarm. –  pepoluan Mar 10 at 12:33
    
@pepoluan thanks! –  Martin Mar 10 at 13:10
    
Agreed, I use Google and the upstream router on each of our connections. One happens to be line of sight wireless to a nearby hill so I ping the router at that location. In the case of that circuit, if that fails, it most certainly has an issue. –  MikeAWood Mar 10 at 18:28

As you mention I primarily use googles public DNS. I have never had an issue with it, however if you feel like that doesn't cover it, you could always check multiple hosts. The chance of 2 major datacenters being down is very little.

For example :

b.resolvers.level3.net - 4.2.2.2
google-public-dns-a.google.com - 8.8.8.8
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.